Cover Image
close this bookAgroforestry in the Pacific Islands: Systems for Sustainability (UNU, 1993, 297 pages)
View the documentPreface
close this folder1 Introduction
View the documentContext of the study
View the documentGeographical background
View the documentDefinition of terms
View the documentDeforestation and agrodeforestation in the Pacific
View the documentOrganization of the study
close this folder2 Pacific Island agroforestry: Functional and utilitarian diversity
View the documentIntegration and sustainability
View the documentDiversity of function
View the documentBases for innovation and sustainability
View the documentAgroforestry and national development goals
View the documentExisting models and the need for appropriate innovation
close this folder3 Agroforestry in Melanesia: Case-studies from Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands
View the documentA note on Melanesia
View the documentHighland fringe, Papua New Guinea
View the documentKologhona village, Weather Coast, Guadalcanal, the Solomon Islands
View the documentBuma village, West Kwara'ae, Malaita, the Solomon Islands
View the documentThe south-eastern Solomon Islands
close this folder4 Agroforestry in Melanesia: Case-studies from Vanuatu and Fiji
View the documentAgroforestry on Aneityum and Tanna, Vanuatu
View the documentFijian agroforestry at Namosi and Matainasau
View the documentA listing of agroforestry components in the landscapes of Namosi and Matainasau
close this folder5 Agroforestry in Polynesia
View the documentA note on Polynesia
View the documentTongatapu island, Tonga
View the documentRotuma island, Fiji
View the documentRarotonga and Aitutaki, the Cook Islands
View the documentThe Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia The Marguesas Islands, French Polynesia
close this folder6 Agroforestry in Micronesia
View the documentA note on Micronesia
View the documentTraditional agroforestry in the high islands of Micronesia
View the documentAtoll agroforestry on Tarawa and Abemama, Kiribati
close this folder7 Pacific Island urban agroforestry
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentHome-garden urban agroforestry
View the documentUrban agroforestry on undeveloped land
View the documentProblems of urban agroforestry
View the documentIntegrating agroforestry into urban planning and policy
View the document8 Agroforestry on smallholder sugar-cane farms in Fiji
close this folder9 Institutional agroforestry in the Pacific Islands
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntercropping of tree crops/woody perennials with commercial or subsistence ground or tree crops
View the documentPlanting of timber, fuel wood, and general-purpose trees in relation to agroforestry and agriculture
View the documentGrazing with commercial tree cropping and silviculture
View the documentThe future of institutional agroforestry in the Pacific
close this folder10 Agroforestry in the Pacific Islands: Systems for sustainability
View the documentSmallholder farmers and the larger community, individual land holdings and the landscape: The agroforestry predicament
View the documentThe component trees
View the documentEncouraging agroforestry
View the documentAppendix One hundred Pacific Island agroforestry trees (1)
View the documentAppendix One hundred Pacific Island agroforestry trees (2)
View the documentAppendix One hundred Pacific Island agroforestry trees (3)
View the documentAppendix One hundred Pacific Island agroforestry trees (4)
View the documentAppendix One hundred Pacific Island agroforestry trees (5)
View the documentAppendix One hundred Pacific Island agroforestry trees (6)
View the documentReferences (A-E)
View the documentReferences (F-R)
View the documentReferences (S-Z)
View the documentContributors

Contributors

RANDOLPH R. THAMAN. Professor of Pacific Islands Biogeography at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji, where he has been since 1974. He also serves as Chairman of the Fiji National Food and Nutrition Committee and was founder and Chairman (1982-1986, 19891990) of the South Pacific Action Committee for Human Ecology and the Environment (SPACHEE). His B.A. and M.A. in Geography are from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles. His research interests include Pacific Island agriculture, agroforestry, food systems, nutrition and health, Pacific vegetation and ethnobotany, environmental management and education, and remote sensing. He has carried out field research in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Fiji, Rotuma, Tonga, Nauru, the Cook Islands, Kiribati, Tuvalu, Indonesia, and China.

WILLIAM C. CLARKE has served as Professor of Geography at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji, at Monash University in Melbourne, and at the University of Papua New Guinea. Prior to those appointments, he was Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Human Geography, Research School of Pacific Studies, the Australian National University, and Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu. His B.A. in Anthropology and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Geography are from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include Pacific agriculture and agroforestry, tropical biogeography, soil erosion, human ecology, and tourism. He has carried out field research in the Caribbean, Cape York, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Rotuma, and Vanuatu.

HARLEY I. MANNER. Professor of Geography, University of Guam, where he has been since 1985; formerly Senior Lecturer in Geography at the University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji. He has a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Hawaii, Honolulu. His research interests include Pacific agriculture and agroforestry, vegetation degradation and retrogression, effects of reforestation on soils and hydrology, environmental management, medicinal plants, and Pacific ethnobotany. He has carried out field research in Hawaii, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Rotuma, Nauru, and several islands in Micronesia.

BRYCE G. DECKER received his Ph.D. from the University of California in 1970, with a dissertation on the plant cover in and near the inhabited valleys of the Marquesas Islands. Following appointments at the University of Delaware and the Department of Botany at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, he joined the Department of Geography at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu, where he presently serves. His research interests include historical geography of the Pacific Islands from a biological and ecological perspective, vegetation and flora, plant geography, Hawaii and French Polynesia, and problems of conservation and land use, with special reference to Hawaii.

IMAM ALI received his B.Ed. in 1976 from the University of the South Pacific. While serving as the Principal of a high school in Fiji, he took up postgraduate studies in Geography and received an M.A. from the University of the South Pacific with a thesis on changing patterns of land use among a community of sugar-cane farmers in Fiji. He is presently a Lecturer in Geography at the University of the South Pacific, after recently completing four years as a Ph.D. scholar in Human Geography at the Australian National University, carrying out research on changes among highland vegetable farmers in Sabah.