Rāpopoto reo Pākehā
Pukapuka 3, Nama 3
18440301


 
pp.13-14 The superstitions of the ancestors of England
Explanation of English beliefs and practices of worship before the inception of Christianity, of superstitious manifestations and omens, the process and exorcism of spirits, and the consequence of and justification for sacrifice, with a rebuttal of the practices from Deuteronomy 18:21-22. Continued in Vol. 3, No. 4:20.
pp.14-16 Letters to the Editor
From Maori
Critiques the actions and status of Te Mania of Ngāti Whātua as leader; argues that leaders should lose their status if they harbour criminals or fugitives or commit a crime.
Response in agreement from the Editor.
From Whakatūpererū [Agitator]
A critique of the claim as presented by the newspaper that Maori are acquiring Pakeha practices; reports that from his observations Maori are not relinquishing their customs, even those Maori regarded as peaceful. Examines the aspiration of the Governor to take responsibility for Maori guidance and direction.
Identifies with the areas of Waimate and Kaikohe. Discusses his initial perception that Pakeha will destroy Maori because of the effect on Maori of firearms, but cites in contrast the influence of colonisation on Ngā Puhi, the attempts of [Nopera] Panakareao to settle peacefully, the unity of Ngā Puhi, the reputation of Maori because of past events, and the legacy of colonisation left by the leaders to their people.
p.16 Victoria our Queen
Description of the proceedings leading up to the report of a message from Queen Victoria to the people of New Zealand. Discusses the benefits to Maori in accepting a church education; the acceptance by Maori of ministers to the regions; the congenial relations between Maori and Pakeha; the jurisdiction of British law; the counsel offered by the Bible; and the support for governance of the land.
[Notices]
Of the escape of Tītoi, Hāmi, and Tumutumu charged with theft from the business of Te Kereama [Robert Graham].
Reward for the apprehension of the thief who burgled Mākareta Te Ponarua.