close this bookVolume 2: No. 28
View the documentNews -- politics
View the documentNews -- economy
View the documentNews -- graphics
View the documentNews -- computer industry
View the documentNews -- OCR; handwriting recognition
View the documentNews -- job opportunities
View the documentDiscussion -- software careers

Motorola's Robert Galvin has suggested that Congress seed classrooms with 1M-2M multimedia computers in order to kick-start a new computer industry. Congress has not responded. [Electronic News, 4/27.]

The VITAL VII(i) flight-training system from McDonnell Douglas (McLean, VA) uses ASIC to display up to 2,250 colored surfaces and 3,000 symbols. Surfaces may be textured, so fewer polygons are needed. Wispy cloud, foliage, and smoke effects are also available. (703) 883-3825. [PR NewsWire, 4/9. agentsee.]

Prime Computer (Bedford, MA) has created a new CV-DORS business unit to market its Computervision Developers Open Resource Software. The DORS software library includes a geometric modeler and graphics engine suitable for electronic design and CAD/CAM. $3K, but I wouldn't be surprised if there's an educational discount. "It's all incremental revenue for the company," according to Dr. Ken Versprille. [Electronic News, 4/27.]

Entertainers Lily Tomlin and Shelley Duvall joined a Digital World panel to extol the promise of multimedia. Duvall owns Think Entertainment, a company producing multimedia titles. (She has also produced and directed fairy tales for TV and videotape release.) "I don't think I'll be satisfied with working in three dimensions ever again." [Rory J. O'Connor, SJM, 7/1.] Bill Park says that Madonna also has her own multimedia production company.

Dr. William "Information Technology Consultant to the Stars" Park (park@netcom.com) offers a tip for selling studies to executives. Information professionals have little time for reading in-depth analyses, but are hungry for easily explained charts and graphs. Ready-made vu-graphs are popular, especially with Japanese customers. Graphic artists often subscribe to clip-art services; apparently executives are eager to do the same with trend-revealing charts and graphs.