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Larry Hunter's favorite neural-network simulator is Xerion 3.0, free from Drew van Camp at UToronto. Source code is in C, with X-window graphics. Demos include back propagation, recurrent back propagation, Boltzmann machine, mean field theory, free energy manipulation, Kohonnen net, and hard/soft competitive learning. FTP'd from ai.toronto.edu. [hunter@nlm.nih.gov, 11/4.]

SOM_PAK, the Self-Organizing Map Program Package, is available in Version 1.2 from the Helsinki University of Technology. For theory, see Teuvo Kohonen, "The Self-Organizing Map," Proc. IEEE, 78(9):1464-1480, 1990. The package is written in ANSI C for Unix (som_pak-1.2.tar.Z) or MS DOS (som_p1r2.exe). Use binary FTP from /pub/som_pak on cochlea.hut.fi (130.233.168.48). Questions to som@cochlea.hut.fi. [LVQ_PAK (lvq@cochlea.hut.fi), connectionists, 11/3.] HUT also has a Learning Vector Quantization program, just upgraded to Version 2.1. FTP files from /pub/lvq_pak. [Neuron Digest, 11/6.]

HNC's Database Mining Workstation generates and explains predictive decision models. $19,950. (619) 546-8877. [AI Magazine, Fall 92.]

The Turing Institute has evaluated seven KBS tools: ADS, ART-IM, KBMS, KES, Level5 Object, Nexpert Object and TIRS. The 3-volume report is $950 or UK#550. +44 (0)41 552 6400, or (508) 256-9593. [MIN, 7/92.]

The tour group led by Ed Feigenbaum has reported that nearly all expert system tools in Japan come from the major computer companies. Hitachi has sold 4K of its ES/Kernel tool. Japan's steel industry has been the most active customer. Fuzzy logic is also a big success in Japan, partly due to the International Fuzzy Engineering Research (LIFE) effort. [David Blanchard, ISR. MIN, 7/92.]

Neuron Data's Nexpert Object 3.0 has a graphical interface so that users needn't write C code. (415) 321-4488. [David Blanchard, ISR. MIN, 7/92.]

"C4.5: Programs for Machine Learning" by J. Ross Quinlan is available. C4.5 derives decision trees or rules from labeled classes, and can handle tens of thousands of cases with hundreds of nominal and numeric properties. The book and C/Unix source code are $69.95 (+ $3.50) in the U.S., $76 (+ $6.50) elsewhere. Morgan Kaufmann (morgan@unix.sri.com), (800) 745-7323, (415) 578-9911, (415) 578-0672 Fax. [comp.ai, 10/9.]

BABYLON is a public-domain expert system shell in Common Lisp for many platforms. The German National Research Center for Computer Science (GMD) developed BABYLON, and Apple ships it with the Macintosh Allegro Common Lisp 2.0 CD-ROM. Full source code and a stand-alone Mac version -- no MACL needed -- comes with T. Christaller's "The AI Workbench BABYLON" (Academic Press, London, 1992, 474 pp., ISBN 0-12-174235-0). You can also FTP the code (bin-hexed StuffIt format) from gmd/ai-research/Software on gmdzi.gmd.de (129.26.8.90). [Andy Kohl (kohl@gmdzi.gmd.de), comp.ai, 10/9.]

IBM's CLP(R) is now available in Version 1.2, free to academic and research users. CLP(R) is a constraint logic programming language with real-arithmetic constraints. It also subsumes PROLOG. Applications have included molecular biology, finance, and physical modeling. The new version adds arc sin/cos constraints, several system predicates, and support for MS DOS and OS/2 2.0. Ask Joxan Jaffar (joxan@watson.ibm.com) or Roland Yap (roland@cs.monash.edu.au) for the documentation and C-language source files. [comp.ai.shells, 10/23.]

MicroGA is a C++ object framework for genetic algorithms. on the Mac or MS Windows. Includes sample source for function optimization, resource allocation, and TSP. $249 + $3 S&H. Emergent Behavior (Palo Alto), (415) 494-6763.

Version 5.1 of CLIPS is now available from NASA. The shell runs on PCs, Mac, Vax, and Unix. The new version supports rules, objects, and procedural code. The official COSMIC distribution is $350 plus $140 for documentation; (404) 542-3265. [AI Magazine, Fall 92.] Purchasers are permitted to distribute additional copies of the software for free.