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close this bookThe Medical Profession and the Effects of Weapons - Report of the Symposium (International Committee of the Red Cross , 1996, 62 p.)
close this folder4. The Symposium
View the document4.1 Programme
View the document4.2 Opening remarks
View the document4.3 Presentations
View the document4.4 Mission statement
Open this folder and view contents4.5 Working groups
View the document4.6 Conclusions

4.1 Programme

Friday 8 March

Saturday 9 March

Sunday 10 March

09.00

Registration

08.30

Presentations [D]

08.30

Distribution of reports of working groups + discussion

10.00

Welcome

10.30

Working groups:
- Setting up the working groups
- Discussions objectives for each group

10.30

Plenary discussion of reports

10.15

Opening address

12.30

Lunch

12.30

Lunch

11.15

Presentations [A]

14.00

Working groups

14.00

Plenary discussion of reports

12.30

Lunch

16.00

Working groups continued and preparation of working group reports

16.00

Conclusions and Recommendations

14.00

Presentations [B]



17.00

Close of the Symposium

16.00

Presentations [C]





17.30

Summary of first day’s presentations





List of presentations

A.1

Ms Louise Doswald-Beck
Examples of international treaties addressing the health effects of weapons

A.2

Mr Peter Herby
Anti-personnel mines: from surgical statistics to international advocacy

A.3

Dr W. James
The consequences of the impersonal mine

A.4

Mr Peter Herby
Arms transfer: a perspective

A.5

Dr Vie Neufeld
The Health of Children in War Zones project

B.1

Dr Georg Scharf
The use of mortar bombs and similar weapons in limited conflicts.
The effects thereof in military and civilian patients

B.2

Dr Lennart Johnson
Blast over-pressure induced cardio-pulmonary injury in the pig

B.3

Dr Timothy Gillow
The psychological, social and economic consequences of blinding of young soldiers

B.4

Prof. Bo Rybeck
Non-lethal weapons

B.5

Prof. Norman Rich
A senior professor’s reflections through the eyes of a young military surgeon

B.6

Mr Beat Kneubuehl
Wound ballistics: a health science?

C.1

Dr Robin Coupland
Can we define superfluous injury and unnecessary suffering?

C.2

Ms Franse J. Hampson
Giving substance to the prohibition of “superfluous injury and unnecessary suffering” in humanitarian law and human rights law

C.3

Mr William Arkin
Humanitarian issues regarding “non-lethal” weapons

C.4

Dr Peter Knudsen
The moral and legal obligations of the wound ballistician

C.5

Mr Mark Granat
Small-arms ammunition, international law and reality

D.1

Dr Brian Davey
The role of the doctor during investigations of the alleged use of chemical weapons

D.2

Dr Howard Champion
Physician advocacy and weapons control: lessons from the United States

D.3

Ms Anita Parlow
How humanitarian concerns have been or ought to be galvanized by the medical community: case studies

D.4

Dr Vivienne Nathanson
The role of the medical profession in creating a weapons-wise public conscience and influencing government

D.5

Mr Michael Keating
Professional and political awareness of the effects of weapons: a survey