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close this bookNatural Disasters in South East Asia and Bangladesh - Vulnerability Risks and Consequences (Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters - International Center for Training Exchanges in the Geosciences, 1998, 83 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderINTRODUCTION
View the documentContext and objectives
View the documentGeneral characteristics of the region under study
View the documentStudy plan
close this folderPART I - THE CONSEQUENCES OF NATURAL DISASTERS IN SOUTH EAST ASIA AND BANGLADESH
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1. Overall assessment of natural disasters (events, human implications)
View the document2. Economic consequences
close this folderPART II - NATURAL HAZARDS AND DISASTERS: DISTRIBUTION AND FREQUENCES
View the document1. Types of natural hazards and their distribution
View the document2. Disaster frequency and distribution
close this folderPART III - ASSESSING VULNERABILITY CRITERIA AND GLOBAL RISK LEVELS
close this folder1. Analysis of the vulnerability criteria (figure 30)
View the document1.1. Socio-economic indicators (wealth, health and education)
View the document1.2. Demographic indicators (population density and growth)
View the document1.3. Synthesis
View the document2. Global risk levels (figure 33)
close this folderPART IV - SYNOPTIC ASSESSMENT OF NATURAL HAZARDS ON A NATIONAL SCALE
View the document(introduction...)
close this folder1. Criteria used to identify territories prone to risks
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1.1. Hazards
View the document1.2. Different population types and consequences as concerns vulnerability
close this folder2. Five types of territories prone to risks
View the document(introduction...)
View the document2.1. Deltas
View the document2.2. Inland basins
View the document2.3. Coastal plains
View the document2.4. Coastal mountains
View the document2.5. Inland mountains
View the document3. National distribution of the territories prone to risks
View the document4. From a typological to a hierarchical classification of the territories prone to risks
close this folderCONCLUSIONS
View the documentPart I - The consequences of natural disasters in South East Asia and Bangladesh
View the documentPart II - Natural hazards and disasters: Distribution and frequencies
View the documentPart III - Assessing vulnerability criteria and global risk levels
View the documentPart IV - Synoptic assessment of natural hazards on a national scale
View the documentBIBLIOGRAPHIC REFERENCES
close this folderAPPENDICES
View the documentAppendix 1 - Map of events distribution according to the nature of disaster phenomena (1900-1996)
View the documentAppendix 2 - Map of events distribution according to the nature of disaster phenomena (1900-1971)
View the documentAppendix 3 - Map of events distribution according to the nature of disaster phenomena (1972-1996)
View the documentAppendix 4 - Physical maps of the seven target countries

General characteristics of the region under study

The region under study consists of 7 countries: Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and the Philippines (Fig. 1). These countries have an estimated population of 385 million inhabitants on a surface area of 2,382,000 km2, giving a population density of 162 inhabitants per square kilometre. Between 1960 and 1994, with the exception of Cambodia, all the countries showed high population growth rates (greater than 2% per year). The group of countries considered are far from being homogeneous and a number of differences have been observed especially in terms of surface area, population sizes and densities (Fig. 2). Despite its relatively small size (144,000 km2), Bangladesh has one of the highest population sizes estimated to be about 30% of the sample area and therefore has a very high population density (836 inhab./km2). On the contrary, countries like Cambodia and Laos have relatively low population sizes and low to very low population densities (21 inhab./km2 for Laos).

As shown by the urban growth rates, the societies considered are essentially from rural areas. With the exception of the Philippines where more than half of the population is from the urban areas, the urban growth rates are observed to fall in the range of 20-25%. On the other hand, as it will be noted in the analysis of the vulnerability criteria, the urban growth rates are on the whole very high.


Fig. 1 - The seven target countries

Fig. 2 - Principal characteristics of the seven target countries.

Countries

Population *

Area (km2)

Density *

Urban pop. rate **

Bangladesh

120,433,000

143,998

836

18.3

Cambodia

10,251,000

181,035

57

20.7

Laos

4,882,000

236,800

21

21.7

Myanmar

46,527,000

676,552

69

26.2

Philippines

68,420,000

300,000

228

54.2

Thailand

60,210,000

514,000

117

20.1

Vietnam

74,545,000

329,566

226

20.8

Region

385,268,00

2,381,951

162

26.5

Source: Etat du Monde, (Edition La Duverte, 1997)
* Last census data of each country (different years).
** Estimation for 1995.