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close this bookDisaster and Development - Trainer's Guide - 1st edition (Disaster Management Training Programme, 57 p.)
View the documentTRAINER'S GUIDE
View the documentTHE BASICS
View the documentTHE SPECIFICS: Disasters and development
close this folderINTRODUCTION (15 minutes)
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1. Learning objectives
close this folderPART ONE: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DISASTERS AND DEVELOPMENT (45 minutes)
View the document2. Part 1 learning objectives
View the document3. Introduction to disasters & development
View the document4. The relationship between disasters and development
View the document5. Definition of terms
View the document6. Disaster effects can vary by hazard
View the document7. Question
View the document8. Vulnerability can vary based on local economic conditions
View the document9. Question
View the document10. Summary
close this folderPART TWO: UNDERSTANDING AND EXPLOITING DISASTER/DEVELOPMENT LINKAGES (45 minutes)
View the document11. Part 2 learning objectives
View the document12. Impact of disasters on development programs
View the document13. Question
View the document14. Question
View the document15. Large scale development projects
View the document16. Development programs can increase vulnerability
View the document17. Question
View the document18. Development programs can decrease vulnerability
View the document19. Question
View the document20. Disasters provide opportunities for development initiatives
View the document21. Question
View the document22. Recovery programs can reduce vulnerability and promote development
View the document23. Question
View the document24. Summary
close this folderPARTS THREE AND FOUR: ASSESSING TRADE-OFFS IN INVESTING IN VULNERABILITY REDUCTION AND FORGING THE LINKS BETWEEN DISASTER AND DEVELOPMENT(45 minutes)
View the document25. Learning objectives
View the document26. Comparing development investments
View the document27. Definitions
View the document28. Estimating losses, costs and benefits
View the document29. Advantages of formal quantitative methods
View the document30. Summary
View the document31. Learning objectives
View the document32. Role of the UN and NGOs
View the document33. Collaborating constituencies
View the document34. Question
View the document35. Involving the affected community
View the document36. Question
close this folderWRAP-UP (15 minutes)
View the document(introduction...)
View the document37. Mary Anderson quote
View the document38. Learning objectives

6. Disaster effects can vary by hazard


Figure

Provide a general discussion of the results from different hazards. Use the table and the case studies to develop the discussion. Ask if any participants were present for these disasters and if so, ask for confirming evidence. Review conclusions from pages 6 & 7 of the module.

ECONOMIC LOSSES CAUSED BY RECENT NATURAL DISASTERS OF GEOLOGICAL ORIGIN IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN (in millions of 1987 US dollars)

EARTHQUAKES

HURRICANES

FLOODS/DROUGHTS


Mexico City

Ecuador

David & Frederick

El NiB>


1985

1987

1979

1982-1983

TOTAL LOSSES

4337

1001

1057

3970

DIRECT LOSSES

3793

186

842

1311

Capital stock

3777

184

506

1060

Inventories

16

2

230

251

Production

0

0

106

0

INDIRECT LOSSES

544

815

215

2659

Production

154

704

185

1284

Services

390

111

30

1375

SECONDARY EFFECTS

4050

794

606

0

Public sector finances

1899

397

303

0

Increased expenditures

2025

55

264

0

Decrease in revenues

(126)

342

39

0

EXTERNAL SECTOR

8579

781

464

621

Reduction of exports

1650

635

167

547

Increase in imports

9075

155

296

74

Disaster-related income

(2146)

(9)

0

0