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close this bookDisaster Rescue - Australian Emergency Manual (Natural Disaster Organization, 183 p.)
close this folderCHAPTER THREE - ROPES, CHAINS AND SLINGS
View the documentRopes, Chains and Slings
View the documentTerminology
Open this folder and view contentsNatural Fibre Ropes
Open this folder and view contentsSynthetic Fibre Ropes
View the documentClimbing Tape
View the documentSteel Wire Rope (SWR) - Safe Working Loads (Figure 3:11)
Open this folder and view contentsPrecautions in Operations
Open this folder and view contentsChains and Slings
View the documentHook Mousing
Open this folder and view contentsKnots
View the documentKnot Safety
View the documentKnot Strengths
Open this folder and view contentsLashings

Terminology

3.1 Terminology

The following is standard rope and knot terminology:

Anchored:

Fastened to some immovable object.

Belayed:

Controlled under tension by a rescuer.

Bight:

An open circle in a rope - also refers to the middle part of a length of rope (Figure 3:1).

Breaking Strain:

See 'Mean Breaking Load’.

Frapping:

The binding together of a lashing between two poles.

Hauling:

The act of pulling on a rope.

Hitch:

A closed loop on a rope: a simple fastening of a rope around some object by winding and crossing one turn so that one section of the rope bites on the other without actually knotting the rope.

Marrying:

Twisting the running end around the standing part, in the same direction as the lay of the rope.

Mean Breaking Load:

The averaged ultimate breaking point of rope. Expressed in kilograms (kg) or kilo-newtons (kN) following rigorous testing.

Mousing:

Tying a piece of cord or wire across the jaws of a hook to prevent a rope or sling from jumping out.

Parcelled:

When part of a rope is wrapped to prevent chafing.

Paying Out or Easing:

To ease off or slacken a rope.

Reeve:

The threading of a rope through pulley blocks or snatch blocks.

Round Turn:

One complete turn of a rope round a spar or another rope. (Figure 3:1)

Running End:

The free end of a rope. (Figure 3:1)

Safe Working Load (SWL):

The load which can SAFELY be applied to a rope. (See para 3.4 for calculation)

Standing Part:

The part of a rope which is taking the load. (Figure 3:1)

Whipping:

Binding the end of a laid rope with twine to prevent untwisting or fraying. Figure 3:2 illustrates one method of whipping. Other methods including mechanical means are available.


Fig 3:1 Parts of a rope


Fig 3:2 Basic whipping