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close this bookDisaster Rescue - Australian Emergency Manual (Natural Disaster Organization, 183 p.)
close this folderCHAPTER THREE - ROPES, CHAINS AND SLINGS
View the documentRopes, Chains and Slings
View the documentTerminology
Open this folder and view contentsNatural Fibre Ropes
Open this folder and view contentsSynthetic Fibre Ropes
View the documentClimbing Tape
View the documentSteel Wire Rope (SWR) - Safe Working Loads (Figure 3:11)
Open this folder and view contentsPrecautions in Operations
Open this folder and view contentsChains and Slings
View the documentHook Mousing
Open this folder and view contentsKnots
View the documentKnot Safety
View the documentKnot Strengths
Open this folder and view contentsLashings

Steel Wire Rope (SWR) - Safe Working Loads (Figure 3:11)

3.15 Steel wire rope consists of a number of strands (usually six) with a fibre core. Each strand consists of a number of steel wires - the most common form of construction being 6/19 indicating six strands each of nineteen steel wires with a fibre core. During manufacture, wires and strands are either coated with lubricant to prevent corrosion and friction in the rope, or are galvanised. The size of steel wire rope (SWR) is measured by its diameter (D) in millimetres. Once again a rule of thumb method for calculating Safe Working Loads is given for use in the field in the absence of any manufacturers specifications.

D²mm x 8 = SWL in kg

eg.

New 14mm steel wire rope
14 x 14 x 8 = 1568kg

If a steel wire rope is sharply bent, the Safe Working Load must be reduced by 30%.


Fig 3:11 Construction of a 6 X 6 wire rope