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close this bookMeans of Identification for Protected Medical Transports (International Committee of the Red Cross , 1994, 18 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. Flags and signs painted on the hulls of ships
View the document3. Radiocommunications
View the document4. Radar identification
close this folder5. Identification by submarines
View the document(introduction...)
View the documenta. Acoustic signature12
View the documentb. Active underwater acoustic identification
View the document6. Other devices facilitating identification
View the document7. Improper use of technical means of identification
View the document8. Conclusion
View the documentREAD AND ENCOURAGE OTHERS TO READ THE INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF THE RED CROSS

3. Radiocommunications

During the Second World War medical transports at sea made wide use of radiocommunications to signal their identity and indicate their position and route. Today such means of identification for protected transports (hospital ships, rescue craft and medical aircraft) are even more effective.

When sailing through a dangerous area, e.g. where naval operations could take place, a hospital ship could send out a blind transmission on the appropriate frequency to provide identification, giving its call sign (which provides information on its nationality), its name, position, destination and route, in accordance with the International Telecommunication Union's Radio Regulations.11 For obvious reasons of security, no answer would be transmitted by ships involved in military operations.

11Radio Regulations, Arts 40 and N40, International Telecommunication Union, Geneva.