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close this bookResource Management for Upland Areas in Southeast Asia - An Information Kit (IIRR, 1995, 207 p.)
close this folder4. Diagnostic methods and tools
View the documentParticipatory appraisal methods
View the documentIntegrated land-use planning in upland areas
View the documentFarm househoId profile
View the documentGender analysis
View the documentCollecting information on crops
View the documentBuilding on indigenous knowledge

Integrated land-use planning in upland areas


Planning process

Considerations

· Use land according to its capacity.

· Production needs must balance with environmental conservation needs.

· Promote efficiency and long-term stability of land use.

· Plans must be sensitive to local culture.

· The complex upland situation requires an integrated approach.

· Dialogue between farmer and extension worker is necessary to find viable solutions.

· Soil and water conservation measures need time to take effect; therefore, long-term solutions must be linked to the solution of the farmer's immediate priorities.

Important

An interdisciplinary and participatory process helps avoid treating symptoms rather than actual causes.

Ecological context

· Climate changes
· Food chain disruption
· Diminishing productivity
· Unstable soil
· Forest changes
· Flood and droughts
· Other environmental effects of human activities.

An example of the results of a land-use planning process (carried out in Northern Thailand)

Potential innovation

Areas of sloping land

Assumptions for successful implementation


Top

Middle

Bottom


Permanent tree cover

x



Other lands available on slopes for cash-crop cultivation

No burning

x

x

x

Alternative weed/pest management





Adequate labor available

Use of mulch


x

x

Awareness of mulching benefits





Adequate labor and mulch available

Minimum tillage


x

x

Economic feasibility





Mulch used





Labor available for seedbed preparation





Willingness to shift from mono- to multiple cropping





Awareness of erosion problems in area.

Hedgerows

x

x


Financial benefits from hedgerows





Hedgerows visibly reduce erosion.





No down-hill plowing

Cut-and-carry livestock

x

x

x

Adequate labor available

management




Awareness of possible impact of free grazing





Training in livestock management

Intercropping


x


Financially viable market for intercrop increased income from intercropping





Adequate labor available

Fruit-tree cultivation


x

x

Higher income from fruit-tree cultivation





Transition period can be tolerated.





Cash, seedlings and labor available for tree establishment





Promising market for fruit.

Cover crops


x

x

Cover cropping financially beneficial





Awareness of erosion problems in area





Extension available

Fertilization


x

x

For some farmers: credit availability

Crop diversification

x

x

x

No dependence on monocrop middlemen

Integrated aquaculture



x

Knowledge/technical supervision





Fingerlings available





Proper pesticide management on adjacent lands.