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close this bookEntrepreneurial Skills for Small Business - Curriculum document (TAFE, 1994, 66 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
Open this folder and view contentsENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS FOR SMALL BUSINESS
Open this folder and view contentsENTREPRENEURIAL SKILLS
Open this folder and view contentsPLANNING TO START A SMALL BUSINESS
Open this folder and view contentsESTABLISHING A SMALL BUSINESS
Open this folder and view contentsMANAGING AND OPERATING A SMALL BUSINESS
Open this folder and view contentsEVALUATING A SMALL BUSINESS
Open this folder and view contentsENTREPRENEURIAL SMALL BUSINESS PROJECT
Open this folder and view contentsSTATEMENTS OF PRINCIPLE
View the documentGUIDELINES FOR IMPLEMENTATIONS
View the documentEVALUATION STATEMENT

EVALUATION STATEMENT

Evaluations should be carried out in two stages:

A Pilot project evaluation
B Full scale evaluation of Project 2000.

A Pilot Project Evaluation

After one or two groups have completed the course, there should be an evaluation of the curriculum, addressing points such as:

· flexibility of the curriculum for national adaptation

· relevance to the target student group

· feedback from teachers regarding:

- comprehensive nature of the competencies
- ease of delivery
- availability of resources

· feedback from students regarding:

- ease of comprehension
- complexity of learning
- relevance to their goals

· feedback from business people and industry representatives

· other relevant evaluation issues

B Full Scale Evaluation of Project 2000

At the end of the Project 2000, there should be a full scale evaluation of the curriculum. This evaluation exercise may include specialists who are external to the institution. The following list offers suggestions on what might be asked:

a) Are the goals and objectives being achieved?

b) What changes in the organisational life of the institution have occurred?

c) Is there support for the programme to continue?

d) Is the programme cost effective?

e) Are any changes needed to the original conditions?

f) What are the opportunities for further development?

There needs to be an impact analysis about the curriculum, looking at the impact on learners, institutions offering it and target groups.

This evaluation can be carried out by using checklists, interviews and SWOT analysis.

After the evaluation, the results of the evaluation from the involved national institution, should be presented as an evaluation report of the curriculum - including a simple statement describing the impact, for the monitoring committee and UNESCO.

The reports of member countries could be exchanged in a meeting which would be the starting point of the next stage of our project

Key Areas of Competence
Entrepreneurial Skills

Key Areas of Competence
Business Skills

Language and Communication
Speaking
Listening
Reading
Writing
Accessing and using information


Understanding reports
Communication skills
Customer service
Telephone techniques
Legal requirements

Scientific and Technological Understanding
Scientific and technology concepts
Impact of science and technology
Scientific and technological skills


Use of computers
Use of office equipment
- photocopier
- facsimile
- projectors
Operating equipment/machinery

Problem Solving
Analysis
Critical thinking
Decision making
Creative thinking
Skills transfer to new contexts


Problem solving
Creating opportunities
Executing a business plan
Planning

Mathematics
Computation
Measurement
Understanding mathematical symbols


Finance - understanding
Technical production skills
Budgeting
Decision making
Pricing/costing

Cultural Understanding
National context
Global issues
World of work


Relation with range of:
- customers
- employees
Trade with other countries

Personal and Interpersonal
Personal management
Negotiating, team skills
Initiative, leadership
Adaptability to change
Self-esteem
Ethics


Employing staff
Customer relations
Personnel practices