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close this bookGlobalization and Living Together: The Challenges for Educational Content in Asia (CBSE - IBE, 2000, 136 p.)
close this folderPART II: SOME CHALLENGES FOR THE ADAPTATION OF CONTENT RAISED BY THE PRINCIPLE OF LEARNING TO LIVE TOGETHER
View the documentAdaptation of content to address the principle of learning to live together: the challenge for teacher training1
View the documentThe potentials and challenges of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for education: the training of teachers
View the documentThe potentials and challenges of information and communication technologies for education: globalization of education, adaptation of curricula, new teaching materials and the networking of schools
View the documentLearning to live together: The need for vocationalizing the curriculum

Learning to live together: The need for vocationalizing the curriculum

Arun K. Mishra

Although the objective of developing employable skills and competencies during upper secondary education is included in Indian national education policy documents and the curriculum framework, in reality skill development courses at this level are virtually non-existent in schools. The concept of ‘learning to live together’ is likely to be confined to the informal settings of family and local community.

How may a vocational curriculum lead to a better understanding about the culture and ways of life of different countries and the common principles of living in a global village?

The vocational or pre-vocational curriculum lends itself to the possibility of organizing concrete opportunities for students to collaborate for the good of the group, the class in general, the school or the wider community. Many skills may be taught through services that benefit the community as a whole, bringing the school closer to its environs and helping pupils to become aware of their commitments to school and community. Co-operative activities can promote friendship, communal harmony and empathy for others.

All vocational education programmes and activities should stress the concept of sustainable development with a focus on fostering awareness of key environmental concerns and the rights of all to a decent standard of living.

In India, work experience is an integral component of the primary and secondary school curriculum. By the lower secondary stage, skills taught through this programme can be described as pre-vocational. Knowledge and skills taught are expected to be directly relevant to the prevailing developmental and economic activities of the community.

Here are some suggestions for content of prevocational curricula or work-experience programmes, particularly within a rural context:

· Management of water for domestic and agricultural purposes;
· Development and use of alternative sources of energy;
· Food production, preservation and storage;
· Machine maintenance and repair;
· Handling and use of fertilizers and other chemicals;
· Information management for rural development.