Cover Image
close this bookWomen in Informal Sector (Dar Es Salaam University Press, 1995, 46 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderINTRODUCTION
View the documentWhat is an Informal Sector?
View the documentThe Jua Kali Concept
View the documentSmall is Great
close this folderTHE STUDY OF THE INFORMAL SECTOR
View the documentThe Dualistic Approach
View the documentThe Place of the Informal Sector and Development
close this folderWOMEN IN THE INFORMAL SECTOR
View the documentA Historical Note
View the documentWhy Women Enter Into The Informal Sector?
close this folderWho Are the Women in the Informal Sector?
View the documentThe Class Connotation
View the documentAge
View the documentEducation
close this folderTHE SOCIAL DIMENSION
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderThe Limits
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentEducation and Time
View the documentMarkets
View the documentWork Burden
View the documentSecurity and Health
View the documentFirewood Collection
View the documentOpen Space Cooking
View the documentBeer Brewing
View the documentFeminization of Poverty
close this folderINTERNATIONALIZATION OF POVERTY
View the documentLords of Poverty
View the documentInappropriate Technology
View the documentCONCLUSION
View the documentSELECTED REFERENCES
View the documentBACK COVER

Education

Although the usual definition of the concept “informal business” does not regard education as an important variable we maintain that education is essential in any kind of informal business. Among the total number of women surveyed (N=300) the majority (N= 190=63.3%) had primary school education. None in the lower and middle classes had any University education. Only 2(0.66%) upper class women had a University education, all of whom had retired or resigned from government service to carry out their informal businesses.

Inspite of the lack of adequate eduction among many women in the informal sector, they make some profits which enable them to survive, even though the profit obtained in some businesses (less than 1%) is not enough to warrant them to be regarded as businesses at all. These women must acquire some kind of education and skills which will help them run the businesses more profitably.