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close this bookHealth and Environment in Sustainable Development - Five Years after the Earth Summit (WHO, 1991, 128 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderQuality assurance in microbiology
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentDefinitions
View the documentInternal quality control
View the documentExternal quality assessment
close this folderPart I. Bacteriological investigations
close this folderBlood
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentCauses of bacteraemia
View the documentBlood collection
View the documentBlood-culture media
View the documentProcessing of blood cultures
close this folderCerebrospinal fluid
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentCollection and transportation of specimens
View the documentMacroscopic inspection
View the documentMicroscopic examination
View the documentPreliminary identification
View the documentSusceptibility testing
close this folderUrine
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentSpecimen collection
View the documentCulture and interpretation
View the documentInterpretation of quantitative urine culture results
View the documentIdentification
View the documentSusceptibility tests
close this folderStool
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentCollection of faecal specimens
View the documentCollection of rectal swabs
View the documentExamination of specimens
View the documentPreparation of faecal suspension
View the documentInoculation of agar plates
close this folderLower respiratory tract infections
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentThe most common infections
View the documentCollection of sputum specimens
View the documentProcessing of sputum in the laboratory (for non-tuberculous infections)
View the documentCulture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis
View the documentGeneral note on safety
close this folderUpper respiratory tract infections
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentThe normal flora of the pharynx
View the documentBacterial agents of pharyngitis
View the documentCollection and dispatch of specimens
View the documentDirect microscopy
View the documentCulture and identification
View the documentSusceptibility testing
close this folderSexually transmitted diseases
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentUrethritis in men
View the documentGenital specimens from women
View the documentSpecimens from genital ulcers
close this folderPurulent exudates, wounds, and abscesses
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentCommonly encountered clinical conditions and the most frequent etiological agents
View the documentCollection and transportation of specimens
View the documentMacroscopic evaluation
View the documentMicroscopic examination
View the documentCulture
View the documentIdentification
View the documentSusceptibility testing
close this folderAnaerobic bacteriology
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentDescription of bacteria in relation to oxygen requirement
View the documentBacteriology
close this folderAntimicrobial susceptibility testing
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentGeneral principles of antimicrobial susceptibility testing
View the documentClinical definition of terms “resistant” and “susceptible”: the three-category system
View the documentIndications for routine susceptibility tests
View the documentChoice of drugs for routine susceptibility tests in the clinical laboratory
View the documentThe modified Kirby-Bauer method
View the documentDirect versus indirect susceptibility tests
View the documentTechnical factors influencing the size of the zone in the disc diffusion method
View the documentQuality control
close this folderPart II. Essential media and reagents for isolation and identification of clinical pathogens
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderPriority grading of pathogens, culture media, and diagnostic reagents
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentBlood culture
View the documentCerebrospinal fluid specimens
View the documentUrine
View the documentStool culture
View the documentLower respiratory tract
View the documentUpper respiratory tract
View the documentUrogenital specimens for agents of sexually transmitted diseases
View the documentPus and exudates
View the documentList of recommended culture media and diagnostic reagents for the intermediate microbiological laboratory
View the documentSelected further reading
View the documentSelected WHO publications of related interest
View the documentBack Cover

(introduction...)

World Health Organization
Geneva

The World Health Organization is a specialized agency of the United Nations with primary responsibility for international health matters and public health. Through this organization, which was created in 1948, the health professions of some 165 countries exchange their knowledge and experience with the aim of making possible the attainment by all citizens of the world by the year 2000 of a level of health that will permit them to lead a socially and economically productive life.

By means of direct technical cooperation with its Member States, and by stimulating such cooperation among them, WHO promotes the development of comprehensive health services, the prevention and control of diseases, the Improvement of environmental conditions, the development of health manpower, the coordination and development of biomedical and health services research, and the planning and implementation of health programmes.

These broad fields of endeavour encompass a wide variety of activities, such as developing systems of primary health care that reach the whole population of Member countries: promoting the health of mothers and children: combating malnutrition; controlling malaria and other communicable diseases, including tuberculosis and leprosy; having achieved the eradication of smallpox, promoting mass immunization against a number of other preventable diseases; improving mental health, providing sale water supplies; and training health personnel of all categories.

Progress towards better health throughout the world also demands international cooperation in such matters as establishing international standards for biological substances, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals; formulating environmental health criteria; recommending international nonproprietary names for drugs; administering the International Health Regulations; revising the International Classification of Diseases, Injuries, and Causes of Death; and collecting and disseminating health statistical information.

Further information on many aspects of WHO’S work is presented in the Organization’s publications.

J. Vandepitte
Department of Microbiology
St Raf Academic Hospital
Leuven, Belgium

K. Engbaek
Department of Clinical Microbiology
University of Copenhagen
Herlev Hospital
Herlev, Denmark

P. Piot
Department of Microbiology
Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine
Antwerp, Belgium

&

C. C. Heuck
World Health Organization
Geneva, Switzerland

World Health Organization
Geneva
1991

WHO Library Cataloguing in Publication Data

Basic laboratory procedures in clinical bacteriology/J. Vandepitte... et al.

1. Bacteriological technics 2. Diagnosis, Laboratory - methods I. Vandepitte, J.

ISBN 92 4 154425 2 (NLM Classification: QY 100)

© World Health Organization 1991

Publications of the World Health Organization enjoy copyright protection in accordance with the provisions of Protocol 2 of the Universal Copyright Convention. For rights of reproduction or translation of WHO publications, in part or in toto, application should be made to the Office of Publications, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. The World Health Organization welcomes such applications.

The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the World Health Organization concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

The mention of specific companies or of certain manufacturers’ products does not imply that they are endorsed or recommended by the World Health Organization in preference to others of a similar nature that are not mentioned. Errors and omissions excepted, the names of proprietary products are distinguished by initial capital letters.

The authors alone are responsible for the views expressed in this publication.

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