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close this bookFood from Dryland Gardens - An Ecological, Nutritional, and Social Approach to Small Scale Household Food Production (CPFE, 1991)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPreface
View the documentLet us hear from you
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close this folderHow to use this book
View the document(introduction...)
close this folder1. Introduction
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View the document1.1 Some definitions
View the document1.2 The purpose of this book
View the document1.3 The organization of this book
close this folderPart I - Gardens as a development strategy
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close this folder2. Gardens and nutrition in drylands
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View the document2.1 Summary
View the document2.2 Recommended dietary allowances and the nutrient content of foods
close this folder2.3 Special nutritional needs in drylands
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View the document2.3.1 Children’s Special Needs
View the document2.3.2 Women’s Special Needs
View the document2.3.3 Work
View the document2.3.4 Illness
View the document2.4 Energy
View the document2.5 Protein
close this folder2.6 Vitamins
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View the document2.6.1 Vitamin A
View the document2.6.2 Vitamin D
View the document2.6.3 Vitamin C
View the document2.6.4 Folacin
View the document2.6.5 Thiamin (B1)
View the document2.6.6 Riboflavin (B2)
View the document2.6.7 Niacin
close this folder2.7 Minerals
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View the document2.7.1 Iron (Fe)
View the document2.7.2 Zinc (Zn)
View the document2.7.3 Calcium (Ca)
View the document2.8 Fats
View the document2.9 Fiber
View the document2.10 Anti-Nutritients
close this folder2.11 The effects of gardens on nutrition
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View the document2.11.1 Nutrient Yields from Gardens
View the document2.11.2 Effects on Nutrition
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close this folder3. Gardens, economics, and marketing
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View the document3.1 Summary
close this folder3.2 People, households, and economics
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View the document3.2.1 Production Efficiency
View the document3.2.2 Economic Rationality and Risk
View the document3.2.3 Control of Resources: Individual or the Group?
View the document3.2.4 Economic Development and Well-Being
close this folder3.3 Garden economics
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View the document3.3.1 Garden Yields
View the document3.3.2 Income and Savings from Gardens
View the document3.3.3 Household Well-Being
close this folder3.4 Marketing garden produce
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View the document3.4.1 Women and Marketing
View the document3.4.2 Risk, Investment, and Return
View the document3.4.3 Cooperation
View the document3.4.4 Garden Income and the Household
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close this folder4. Assessment techniques
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View the document4.1 Summary
View the document4.2 Assessment, monitoring, and evaluation
close this folder4.3 From whose point of view?
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View the document4.3.1 Assessment and Collaboration
View the document4.3.2 Representativeness
View the document4.3.3 Insiders and Outsiders
View the document4.3.4 Participant Observation
View the document4.3.5 Gardens for Whom?
View the document4.4 What do existing gardens tell us?
close this folder4.5 Interviews
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View the document4.5.1 Composing Questions
View the document4.5.2 Translating and Back-Translating
View the document4.5.3 Choosing a Sample
View the document4.5.4 Pretesting
View the document4.5.5 Conducting the Interview
View the document4.5.6 Coding, Checking, and Analyzing
View the document4.6 Seasonality
View the document4.7 Food distribution and consumption
View the document4.8 Maps
View the document4.9 Long-term trends
View the document4.10 Outside sources
View the document4.11 Resources
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close this folderPart II - Garden management
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close this folder5. How plants live and grow
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View the document5.1 Summary
close this folder5.2 The vascular system in plants
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View the document5.2.1 Roots
View the document5.3 Photosynthesis
View the document5.4 Transpiration
View the document5.5 Coping with heat and drought
View the document5.6 Salt tolerance
close this folder5.7 Seasonal constraints to plant growth
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View the document5.7.1 Daylength Requirements
View the document5.7.2 Temperature Requirements
View the document5.8 Resources
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close this folder6. Growing plants from seeds
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View the document6.1 Summary
close this folder6.2 Sexual reproduction in plants
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View the document6.2.1 Life Cycles
View the document6.2.2 Flowering
View the document6.2.3 Pollination
View the document6.2.4 Fertilization
View the document6.3 Seed germination and dormancy
close this folder6.4 Suggestions for planting seeds under dryland conditions
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View the document6.4.1 Preparing the Seeds
View the document6.4.2 Preparing the Planting Site
View the document6.4.3 Planting the Seeds
View the document6.4.4 Planting Density
View the document6.4.5 Covering the Seeds
close this folder6.5 Caring for newly planted seeds and young seedlings
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View the document6.5.1 Watering
View the document6.5.2 Mulching and Shading
close this folder6.6 Diagnosing seed planting problems
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View the document6.6.1 Testing Seed Germination
View the document6.7 Thinning
View the document6.8 Resources
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close this folder7. Vegetative propagation
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View the document7.1 Summary
close this folder7.2 Cuttings
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View the document7.2.1 Trees
View the document7.2.2 Perennial Herbs
View the document7.2.3 Cassava.
View the document7.2.4 Sweet Potatoes
View the document7.3 Tubers, tuberous roots, and bulbs
View the document7.4 Offsets
View the document7.5 Suckers
close this folder7.6 Grafting
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View the document7.6.1 Compatibility for Grafting
View the document7.6.2 Effects of Stock and Scion on the Grafted Tree
View the document7.6.3 Approach or Attached Scion
View the document7.6.4 Budding
View the document7.6.5 Apical Grafting
View the document7.6.6 Topworking
close this folder7.7 Layering
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View the document7.7.1 Simple Layering
View the document7.7.2 Air Layering
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close this folder8. Plant management
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View the document8.1 Summary
close this folder8.2 Nursery beds and container planting
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View the document8.2.1 Nursery Beds
View the document8.2.2 Container Planting
View the document8.2.3 When Direct Planting is Better
View the document8.3 Planting sites and the sun
close this folder8.4 Transplanting
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View the document8.4.1 Timing
View the document8.4.2 The Site
View the document8.4.3 Water
View the document8.4.4 The Transplant
close this folder8.5 Plant interactions
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View the document8.5.1 Mixed Planting
View the document8.5.2 Allelopathic Plants
View the document8.5.3 Crop Rotation
close this folder8.6 Weed management
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View the document8.6.1 Resource Use
View the document8.6.2 Effects on Pest Populations
View the document8.6.3 Timing
View the document8.6.4 Methods of Weed Control
close this folder8.7 Pruning
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View the document8.7.1 Reasons to Prune
View the document8.7.2 Guidelines for Pruning Trees
View the document8.8 Trellising
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close this folder9. Soils in the garden
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View the document9.1 Summary
close this folder9.2 Soil and land-use classification
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View the document9.2.1 Indigenous Classification Systems
View the document9.2.2 The USDA Classification of Soils in Drylands
close this folder9.3 Physical properties of soils
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View the document9.3.1 Soil Texture and Structure
View the document9.3.2 Soil Porosity and Permeability
View the document9.3.3 Soil Color
View the document9.3.4 Soil Temperature
View the document9.4 Soil profile and depth
close this folder9.5 Soils and plant nutrients
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View the document9.5.1 Soil pH and Plant Nutrition
View the document9.5.2 Nitrogen
View the document9.5.3 Phosphorus and Potassium
View the document9.5.4 Other Nutrients
close this folder9.6 Organic matter
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View the document9.6.1 Animal Manures
View the document9.6.2 Composting
close this folder9.7 Preventing soil erosion
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View the document9.7.1 Decreasing Runoff
View the document9.7.2 Decreasing Raindrop Impact
View the document9.7.3 Increasing Soil Resistance to Erosion
View the document9.7.4 Reducing Wind Erosion
close this folder9.8 Building garden beds
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View the document9.8.1 Sunken Beds
View the document9.8.2 Raised Beds
View the document9.9 Resources
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close this folder10. Water, soils, and plants
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View the document10.1 Summary
View the document10.2 Dryland garden water management
close this folder10.3 Water, soils, and plants
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View the document10.3.1 Water Storage in the Soil
View the document10.3.2 Water Movement in the Soil
View the document10.3.3 Evaporation
View the document10.3.4 Water Uptake and Transport by Plants
View the document10.4 Soil water and garden yield
View the document10.5 How much water?
View the document10.6 Measuring water applied to the garden
View the document10.7 When to water
close this folder10.8 Mulches, shades, and windbreaks
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View the document10.8.1 Surface Mulches
View the document10.8.2 Vertical Mulches
View the document10.8.3 Windbreaks, Shades, and Cropping Patterns
View the document10.9 Resources
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close this folder11. Sources of water for the garden
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View the document11.1 Summary
View the document11.2 Water quality for plants
View the document11.3 Water quality for people
close this folder11.4 Rain
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View the document11.4.1 Rainfall Records
View the document11.4.2 Measuring Rainfall
close this folder11.5 Harvesting rainwater for dryland gardens
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View the document11.5.1 Patterns of Water Harvesting
View the document11.5.2 Building on Local Knowledge
View the document11.5.3 Catchments and Runoff
View the document11.5.4 Estimating the Catchment to Garden Area Ratio
close this folder11.6 Harvesting stream flow and floodwater
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View the document11.6.1 Water Spreading
View the document11.6.2 Flood Recession Gardening
close this folder11.7 Groundwater and wells
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View the document11.7.1 Groundwater
View the document11.7.2 Locating a Well
View the document11.7.3 Hand-Dug Wells
View the document11.7.4 Small-Diameter Wells
View the document11.8 Water storage
View the document11.9 Resources
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close this folder12. Irrigation and water-lifting
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View the document12.1 Summary
View the document12.2 Irrigation efficiency
close this folder12.3 Surface irrigation
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View the document12.3.1 Transporting Water to the Garden
View the document12.3.2 Basin Irrigation
View the document12.3.3 Furrow Irrigation
View the document12.3.4 Trickle Irrigation
close this folder12.4 Root zone irrigation
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View the document12.4.1 Pitcher Irrigation
View the document12.4.2 Water Table Irrigation
View the document12.5 Sprinkler irrigation
close this folder12.6 Irrigation problems
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View the document12.6.1 Waterlogging
View the document12.6.2 Salinity
close this folder12.7 Water-lifting
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View the document12.7.1 Lifting with Human and Animal Power
View the document12.7.2 Lifting with Other Power Sources
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close this folder13. Pest and disease management
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View the document13.1 Summary
close this folder13.2 An ecological approach
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View the document13.2.1 Pest and Disease Management by the Crop Plant
View the document13.2.2 Environmental and Mechanical Management of Pests and Diseases
View the document13.2.3 Pest and Disease Management Using Other Organisms
View the document13.2.4 Pest and Disease Management with Chemicals
close this folder13.3 Examples of pest and disease management
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View the document13.3.1 Insects
View the document13.3.2 Nematodes
View the document13.3.3 Large Animals as Pests
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close this folder13.4 Diagnosing pest and disease problems
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View the document13.4.1 Wilts (Table 13.1 and Figure 13.26)
View the document13.4.2 Leaf Problems (Table 13.2 and Figure 13.27)
View the document13.4.3 Abnormal Growth (Table 13.3 and Figure 13.28)
View the document13.4.4 Fruit Problems (Table 13.4 and Figure 13.29)
View the document13.5 Resources
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close this folderPart III - Garden harvest
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close this folder14. Saving seeds for planting
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View the document14.1 Summary
close this folder14.2 Seeds, gardens, and diversity
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View the document14.2.1 Diversity in the Seed
View the document14.2.2 Diversity in the Garden
View the document14.2.3 Conserving and Using Genetic Diversity: How and for Whom?
close this folder14.3 Seed saving
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View the document14.3.1 Seed Harvest and Processing
View the document14.3.2 Seed Drying
close this folder14.4 Saving seed from trees
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View the document14.4.1 Cold Stratification
close this folder14.5 Seed storage
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View the document14.5.1 Moisture and Temperature
View the document14.5.2 Pest Control
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close this folder15. Processing, storing, and marketing food from the garden
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View the document15.1 Summary
View the document15.2 Harvesting garden foods
close this folder15.3 Cooking and using garden foods
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View the document15.3.1 Fresh Foods
View the document15.3.2 Dried Foods
close this folder15.4 Food drying
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View the document15.4.1 Materials for Drying
View the document15.4.2 Preventing Contamination
View the document15.4.3 Selecting and Preparing Produce for Drying
close this folder15.5 Sprouting and malting
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View the document15.5.1 Sprouting
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close this folder15.6 Fermentation
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close this folder15.7 Storing garden foods
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View the document15.7.1 Preharvest Storage
View the document15.7.2 Postharvest Storage of Fresh Produce
View the document15.7.3 Storing Dried Produce
View the document15.7.4 Storing Other Processed Garden Foods
close this folder15.8 Marketing garden produce
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View the document15.8.1 Harvesting for Market
View the document15.5.2 Transport from Garden to Market
View the document15.8.3 Protecting Produce Quality at the Market
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close this folder16. Weaning foods from the garden
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View the document16.1 Summary
View the document16.2 The role of weaning foods
close this folder16.3 Nutrient density
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View the document16.3.1 Energy
View the document16.3.2 Protein
View the document16.3.3 Vitamins and Minerals
View the document16.3.4 Weaning Food Consistency
View the document16.4 Hygiene
View the document16.5 Weaning as a part of daily life
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close this folder17. Glossary
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View the document17.1 Abbreviations used in measurements
View the document17.2 Equivalencies in units of measurement
View the document17.3 Atomic symbols and molecular formulas
View the document17.4 Other abbreviations and acronyms
close this folder18. Some crops for dryland gardens
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View the document18.1 Common English and scientific names for some crops and crop groups
View the document18.2 Important dryland garden plant families
View the document19. Resource organizations
View the document20. References

Let us hear from you

The Center for People, Food and Environment (CPFE) is a non-profit organization devoted to research, education, and action for sustainable food systems. We believe that local control and self-reliance, social equity, cultural and biological diversity, and environmental conservation are essential ingredients of sustainable food systems.

FOOD FROM DRYLAND GARDENS is the first major project of CPFE. The authors of this book are co-directors of CPFE. Organizations or individuals interested in knowing more about CPFE can write to us.

We hope that those of you who use this book will take the time to tell us what you find most helpful, and will give us your suggestions for improvements.

If you have information that is relevant, including your own reports and observations, we would appreciate hearing from you and receiving copies of written works. We have found four types of information most useful in writing this book:

a) reports of basic or applied research (from anthropology to hydrology) relevant to dryland household gardens,

b) reports of how people in drylands are gardening, and the impact of gardens on nutrition, income and community development,

c) manuals for field workers in related areas such as irrigation,

d) reports of garden projects, including brief personal narratives, giving some detailed information on assessment, implementation, and evaluation.

We would be grateful for any information of this sort you could share with us. We will fully acknowledge the source if any of the information you send us is used in subsequent editions or other publications. So let us hear from you. Write to:

CPFE
344 South Third Avenue
Tucson, Arizona 85701, USA