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close this bookDefeating Hunger and Ignorance - Food Aid for the Education of Girls and Women (UNESCO - WFP, 34 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPREFACE
View the documentINTRODUCTION
View the documentFEMALE EDUCATION: ANOTHER GAP TO BRIDGE
View the documentREASONS FOR THE UNDER-EDUCATION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS
View the documentFROM CAUSE TO EFFECT
View the documentTHE ADVANTAGES OF FEMALE EDUCATION
View the documentFROM IDEAS TO CONCRETE ACTION
View the documentWFP AND EDUCATION
View the documentWFP SUPPORT TO EDUCATION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS
View the documentLESSONS LEARNED AND FUTURE ORIENTATIONS
View the documentBIBLIOGRAPHY
View the documentBACK COVER

INTRODUCTION

Millions of women and young girls still do not have access to basic education despite the efforts of the international community. This has all kinds of unfortunate consequences for their lives and those of their families, communities and country.

Several recent initiatives have given a new impetus to the promotion of female education. From the 1990 World Conference on Education for All in Jomtien to the fourth World Conference for Women (Beijing, 1995), from the Cairo Population Conference to the one in Copenhagen on Social Development, and at every other regional or sub-regional meeting such as the 1993 Ouagadougou Conference on the Education of Girls, women’s education has always been emphasised as one of the most important factors in socio-economic development.

WFP (World Food Programme), the food aid organisation of the United Nations, has long been a major player in the development of education in general, with special attention paid to the education of the poor and hungry.

Over the recent years, in light of the Commitments made at the Beijing conference, WFP has been resolute in its support for women and young girls, notably with regard to education.

This booklet presents the various actions and programmes of WFP in female education. They range from food distribution in school canteens to support for women’s education and include several other initiatives that will be presented in this booklet.

UNESCO has been working closely with WFP since its inception in 1963 to ensure that food aid can give education a boost. Of late, this co-operation has tended to focus on female education. We hope this booklet, which consists of four major sections, will be of interest to those working in this field.

Chapter 1 deals with the situation of women and girls in the field of education in developing countries.

Chapter 2 presents the contribution of WFP to education in general.

Chapter 3 focuses on specific WFP actions to promote the education of girls and women.

Chapter 4 analyses WFP’s different programmes for women’s education and makes proposals for the future based on WFP’s past experience.

This booklet is primarily a source of information and does not pretend to be a detailed analysis of all the problems raised or provide definitive solutions.


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