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close this bookNGO Responses to HIV/AIDS In Asia (UNDP, 1992)
close this folderFACILITATORS' NOTE: FAMILY PLANNING AND AIDS PREVENTION - The Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand (PPAT)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentDiscussion Question 1: What factors facilitated the addition of HIV/AIDS interventions to PPAT's family planning programmes? What additional factors might influence the integration of HIV/AIDS programmes in your own country and why?
View the documentDiscussion Question 2: What were the strengths that PPAT brought to the implementation of HIV/AIDS prevention activities in Thailand?
View the documentDiscussion Question 3: What steps did PP AT take to try and ensure the effectiveness of their AIDS education programmes? What additional indicators might PPAT have used to evaluate this effectiveness?
View the documentDiscussion Question 4: What strategies were used by PPAT to help it maintain its effectiveness and to deal with the changes brought about by its decision to get involved in Thailand's fight against AIDS?
View the documentDiscussion Question 5: What strategies had PPAT used to finance its activities? What suggestions would you make to PPAT in relation to their future funding?

Discussion Question 3: What steps did PP AT take to try and ensure the effectiveness of their AIDS education programmes? What additional indicators might PPAT have used to evaluate this effectiveness?

(a) Steps taken by PPAT:

- PPAT kept in contact with the experiences of HIV/AIDS programmes in other countries, learning about effective (and ineffective approaches) to prevention.

- The meetings with HIV+ individuals to develop PPAT's own understanding of the issues involved and the concerns and needs of those infected.

- The extensive use of radio programmes and spots, together with the more restricted use of television programmes to disseminate HIV/AIDS information clearly matched the data on the availability of the radios and TVs in Thailand. (Exhibit 1) Similarly, high literacy rates enabled PPAT to make extensive use of written materials in its education programmes.

- The pre-testing of IEM materials and programmes.

- Interviews with viewers and listeners following airing of the TV and radio programmes.

- The letters from listeners/viewers asking for further information after the programmes.

- Development of targetted IBM materials for the different groups with whom PPAT was working (i.e. students, out-of-school youth, prisoners, fishermen and factory workers).

- The pre and post-meeting questionnaires administered to the participants at the HIV/AIDS education sessions among the slum communities.

- The follow-up of the peer-educators drawn from the slum communities and the provision of continued support and reinforcement for their work.

(b) Other Possible Indicators of Effectiveness:

- Requests from teaching staff at the schools and colleges to provide further information.

- Reports from the various peer educators about the frequency and the types of questions they are asked relating to HIV/AIDS.

- The numbers of condoms sold by the factory representatives prior to and following the inclusion of HIV/AIDS information in the workers' education programme.

- The conduct of KAP studies among the communities with which PPAT was working might have provided further indications of the impact of their education programmes.