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close this bookNGO Responses to HIV/AIDS In Asia (UNDP, 1992)
close this folderFACILITATORS' NOTE: FAMILY PLANNING AND AIDS PREVENTION - The Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand (PPAT)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentDiscussion Question 1: What factors facilitated the addition of HIV/AIDS interventions to PPAT's family planning programmes? What additional factors might influence the integration of HIV/AIDS programmes in your own country and why?
View the documentDiscussion Question 2: What were the strengths that PPAT brought to the implementation of HIV/AIDS prevention activities in Thailand?
View the documentDiscussion Question 3: What steps did PP AT take to try and ensure the effectiveness of their AIDS education programmes? What additional indicators might PPAT have used to evaluate this effectiveness?
View the documentDiscussion Question 4: What strategies were used by PPAT to help it maintain its effectiveness and to deal with the changes brought about by its decision to get involved in Thailand's fight against AIDS?
View the documentDiscussion Question 5: What strategies had PPAT used to finance its activities? What suggestions would you make to PPAT in relation to their future funding?

Discussion Question 4: What strategies were used by PPAT to help it maintain its effectiveness and to deal with the changes brought about by its decision to get involved in Thailand's fight against AIDS?

- PPAT’s style of management, as indicated in the case, was both open and supportive. This would have encouraged staff and volunteers to voice and discuss their concerns and doubts and to work these through with their colleagues.

- The stability of PPAT's workforce indicated a general satisfaction with the organisation and its work. One could also assume that this stability indicates mutual trust between the managers and staff which would facilitate organisational change and development.

- Communication was clearly important to PPAT: the senior PPAT managers made frequent visits to the field to keep in contact both with the individuals and the programmes; informal discussions and sharing of information took place all the time. This would have helped to keep the managers in touch with the staff views and contributed to building a sense of teamwork.

- PPAT's approach to the allocation of work to staff members would have helped to ensure that many individuals would have the opportunity to work on the HIV/AIDS education programmes and thereby experience first hand both the communities' needs for information and their response to PPAT's programmes. This would help to develop understanding among the staff. The system would also have helped to maintain individual's interest in their jobs and to develop their skills.

- PPAT's HIV/AIDS interventions all grew out of their existing or previous programmes and PPAT built upon its contacts and its relationships with the communities. This should have made the clients more receptive to PPAT's HIV/AIDS education activities and helped PPAT in deciding on approaches that would be both acceptable and effective.

- PPAT had clearly managed to maintain a clear focus and mission. The annual meetings between the staff and volunteers, the fact that many staff have stayed with PPAT despite the availability of higher salaries within the private sector, and the fact that it had managed to integrate HIV/AIDS education activities into so many of its programmes and projects, were all evidence that PPAT had managed a significant programme change successfully and effectively.