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close this bookParticipatory Impact Monitoring - PIM : Selected Reading Examples (GTZ)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentDear reader
Open this folder and view contentsReading example no. 1:
Open this folder and view contentsReading example no. 2: Understanding evaluation
Open this folder and view contentsReading example no. 3:
Open this folder and view contentsReading example no. 4:
Open this folder and view contentsReading example no. 5:
View the documentReading example no. 6: Training for Participatory Evaluation
View the documentReading example no. 7: The ten commandments of evaluation

Reading example no. 7: The ten commandments of evaluation

PATTON; Michael Quinn: Creative Evaluation, Newbury Park (USA), 1987.

(For more information please refer to MFN 52)

(1) Thou shalt have no other gods before evaluation-not planning, not policy analysis, not applied social science, certainly nor basic research or theory or sociology or psychology or any other ology or ism because the fields of research are confused enough already and if evaluators don't put evaluation first, then who will?

(2) Thou shalt not worship any idols or other graven images whether they be rock stars, politicians, TV personalities, big-name academics, or any other stakeholders because stakeholders put their pants or skirts on one leg at a time just like evaluators, so if evaluators start worshipping stakeholders, then stakeholders will get to thinking they're better than evaluators and they won't accord us the proper respect - which, if you have noticed, is already in pretty damn short supply.

(3) Thou shalt not take the name of evaluation in vain. (If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all, unless of course you're writing a final evaluation report - then give 'em hell.)

(4) Remember the day your report is due, to keep it holy. Six days (metaphorically) you may gather your data, but the seventh day is set aside to report and apply findings. (There is no day of rest for evaluators.)

(5) Honor your stakeholders and data providers, so that you may continue to find more work to do.

(6) Thou shalt not kill. (Remind stakeholders often of this commandment - especially as it applies to bearers of bad news.)

(7) Thou shalt not commit adultery with stakeholder spouses. (This tends to threaten validity, reliability, objectivity, and your life. If you fail to heed this commandment, and get caught, refer the offended stakeholder back to commandment 6.)

(8) Thou shalt not steal other evaluators' contracts - data maybe, but never contracts.

(9) Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour. (In other words, don't fudge the data It's not nice.)

(10) Thou shalt not covet thy stakeholder's house or thy stakeholder's spouse, or servant, or ox, or donkey, or anything that belongs to your stakeholders, including especially thy stakeholder's stake, which if you coveted it and actually got it would make you the stakeholder rather than the evaluator, which just goes to show you the trouble that can come of this coveting business to begin with - so don't.