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close this bookResources, Power and Women, Proceedings of the African and Asian Inter-regional Workshop on Strategies for Improving the Employment Conditions of Rural Women (ILO, 1985, 96 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPREFACE
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENT
View the documentCHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
View the documentCHAPTER 2 MAJOR ISSUES, CONCLUSIONS AND SUGGESTED FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS
View the documentCHAPTER 3 WOMEN'S PROJECTS AND PROGRAMMES
View the documentCHAPTER 4 ACCESS TO AND CONTROL OVER RESOURCES: LAND/FOREST
View the documentCHAPTER 5 CREDIT AND MARKETING
View the documentCHAPTER 6 ORGANISATION, CONSCIENTISATION AND PARTICIPATION
View the documentCHAPTER 7 APPROACHES TO TECHNICAL CO-OPERATION
View the documentCHAPTER 8 STRATEGIES FOR ACTION: REPORTS OF WORKING GROUPS
View the documentANNEX I List of Participants
View the documentANNEX II Agenda
View the documentANNEX III DOCUMENTS PREPARED FOR THE WORKSHOP*
View the documentANNEX IV INAUGURAL ADDRESS BY THE CHIEF MINISTER, ZANZIBAR.
View the documentANNEX V A REPORT ON THE FIELD TRIP
View the documentBACK COVER

BACK COVER

In August 1984 national planners and representatives of employers' and workers' organisations, grass-roots organisations, international organisations and donor agencies from all over Africa and Asia met in Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, in order to reflect on some of the current major issues of rural development. Recognising that women are the backbone of agricultural production as well as major providers of their families' basic needs, the participants concentrated on strategies likely to enhance women's productive roles and thereby stimulate rural and national development.

Drawing on analyses of action which had been "successful" in improving the employment conditions of rural women, the participants were concerned that "women's projects" should not be marginal, welfare-oriented and isolated, but rather should contribute to strengthening women's productive and developmental roles, and should enable women to gain experience in organising and managing resources. It was suggested that national machineries should play a co-ordinating and catalytic role with respect to mainstream ministries, and development policies and programmes. However, rural women's access to land and other means of production, and the right for women to organise freely in order to pursue the goals they set for themselves, are fundamental to success.