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close this bookResources, Power and Women, Proceedings of the African and Asian Inter-regional Workshop on Strategies for Improving the Employment Conditions of Rural Women (ILO, 1985, 96 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPREFACE
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENT
View the documentCHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
View the documentCHAPTER 2 MAJOR ISSUES, CONCLUSIONS AND SUGGESTED FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS
View the documentCHAPTER 3 WOMEN'S PROJECTS AND PROGRAMMES
View the documentCHAPTER 4 ACCESS TO AND CONTROL OVER RESOURCES: LAND/FOREST
View the documentCHAPTER 5 CREDIT AND MARKETING
View the documentCHAPTER 6 ORGANISATION, CONSCIENTISATION AND PARTICIPATION
View the documentCHAPTER 7 APPROACHES TO TECHNICAL CO-OPERATION
View the documentCHAPTER 8 STRATEGIES FOR ACTION: REPORTS OF WORKING GROUPS
View the documentANNEX I List of Participants
View the documentANNEX II Agenda
View the documentANNEX III DOCUMENTS PREPARED FOR THE WORKSHOP*
View the documentANNEX IV INAUGURAL ADDRESS BY THE CHIEF MINISTER, ZANZIBAR.
View the documentANNEX V A REPORT ON THE FIELD TRIP
View the documentBACK COVER

PREFACE

As part of its continuing effort to encourage debate, discussion and formulation of alternative strategies and actions for promoting employment and income earning opportunities for rural women, the International Labour Office (ILO) organised an African and Asian Inter-regional Workshop on Strategies for Improving the Employment Conditions of Rural Women, in Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, from 20-25 August 1984. The Workshop was co-sponsored by the Centre on Integrated Rural Development in Africa (CIRDAFRICA) and funded by the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA).

The purpose of the Workshop was to exchange information and views on successful and innovative projects for rural women, to draw lessons from successful experiences, and to strengthen ongoing projects and stimulate the initiation of new ones.

The lessons from the field give priority to a number of strategies. Firstly, effective participation - the freedom to organise - is key to rural development. Without organisation poor rural women would not get their rightful share of the productive resources or participate in the decisions that affect their lives. Secondly, development and training of cadres/catalysts is essential since they play a critical role in sustaining people's initiatives. Thirdly, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and other intermediaries need to be strengthened as they are often better equipped than governments to introduce innovative strategies and actions.

Women's issues are central and not peripheral to development. The struggle for equality is not a struggle between women and men - it is a struggle to change social structures and attitudes.

Dharam Ghai,

Ibrahim Kaduma,

Chief,

Director,

Rural Employment Policies Branch,

Centre for Integrated Rural

Employment and Development Department,

Development for Africa

International Labour Office