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close this bookWood Harvesting with Hand Tools - An Illustrated Training Manual (ILO, 1989, 128 p.)
close this folderCROSS-CUT SAWS
View the documentTYPES OF CROSS-CUT SAWS
View the documentMAINTENANCE TOOLS FOR CROSS-CUT SAWS
View the documentFILING VICES, SELF-MADE
View the documentFILING VICES, COMMERCIALLY-MADE
View the documentMAINTAINING A PEG-TOOTH CROSS-CUT SAW
View the documentTYPES OF RAKER-TOOTH CROSS-CUT SAWS
View the documentMAINTAINING A RAKER-TOOTH CROSS-CUT SAW
View the documentMAJOR OVERHAUL OF CROSS-CUT SAWS

TYPES OF CROSS-CUT SAWS

If cross-cut saws are used, a comprehensive tool outfit is required. The saw must be well maintained in order to make the job easy and efficient. Properly maintained saws require less energy in use and increase production.

The saw should be made of high-quality steel. For large trees, a straight-back type of saw is preferable (1a) and for small to medium trees a hollow-back type. The cutting edge should be thicker than the back in order to reduce friction and the risk of "binding". The length of the saw should be 100 cm plus the diameter of the tree. The saw should be fitted with detachable handles (1b) which can easily be screwed on and off. A protective cover (1c) is needed to guard the cutting edge during transport.

Peg-tooth type saws are common because they are easy to maintain (2a).

Raker-tooth type saws are preferred by professional workers. They cut faster but require more skill in maintenance (2b).

Saw teeth must do three things:

- cut through the fibres;
- break loose the cut fibres;
- remove the loose fibres (sawdust) from the kerf.

In peg-tooth saws, these three things are done by one tooth. In raker-tooth saws the first of the three actions is done by a group of cutters cutting on alternate sides of the kerf. The second and third actions are done by the raker following the group of cutters.


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