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close this bookSchool Health Education to Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) : Teachers' Guide (UNESCO - WHO, 1994, 117 p.)
close this folderUnit 3. Responsible behaviour: protected sex
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 The condom - Information about the condom
View the document2 Arguments people use against using condoms - How to deal with a partner who is negative about condom use
View the document3 How to use a condom - Humorous explanation about condom use
View the documentCondom practice - Students practice putting a condom on a model
View the document5 No to unprotected sex (demonstration) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document6 No to unprotected sex (class participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document7 No to unprotected sex (individual participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom

3 How to use a condom - Humorous explanation about condom use

Purpose

One of the most important factors in condom failure is inexperience with its proper use. Therefore, a demonstration of its actual use is important.

What the teacher does

· The teacher should explain to students that at first they might feel awkward but that these feelings pass with practice. If something humorous occurs, enjoy the moment (but don’t accept put-downs).

· The teacher should inform the class that this is an optional activity. However, he/she should indicate to students that the reason for doing this activity is to acquire a skill that may be needed in the future. It is not taught to encourage sex and it is not an invitation to seek sex.

· It may be difficult for students to volunteer for this activity. To avoid embarrassment, it is suggested that the teacher select one or two students (or the peer leaders) to practise. The rest of the class can practise afterwards.

· Give support and positive feedback to the students practicing using a condom.