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close this bookSchool Health Education to Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) : Teachers' Guide (UNESCO - WHO, 1994, 117 p.)
close this folderUnit 3. Responsible behaviour: protected sex
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 The condom - Information about the condom
View the document2 Arguments people use against using condoms - How to deal with a partner who is negative about condom use
View the document3 How to use a condom - Humorous explanation about condom use
View the documentCondom practice - Students practice putting a condom on a model
View the document5 No to unprotected sex (demonstration) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document6 No to unprotected sex (class participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document7 No to unprotected sex (individual participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom

6 No to unprotected sex (class participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom

Purpose

To provide the class with an opportunity to make an assertive response to a person who has negative attitudes towards condoms and is persuading a person to have sex without a condom.

What the teacher does

1. Decide how to teach this activity:

a) Provide each student with an activity sheet. The teacher will read or role-play the situation and students will suggest refuse, delay, and bargain responses. The students and teacher will decide on the best response and put it in the appropriate space.

b) The teacher will do the activity in a similar way as a) but the students will not have an activity sheet. Responses will be written on the blackboard and students will write the best response on a piece of paper (only one activity sheet is needed).

c) Students are placed in small groups and one activity sheet is provided for each group. The group makes suggestions on responses and the best response is recorded. A class activity follows in which the best response from the various groups is recorded on the blackboard (only one activity sheet per group is needed).

2. Suggestions for refuse, delay and bargain responses are obtained from the students and the best response is recorded.

3. When completed, role-play the total scene three times - using refusal the first time, delay the second and bargain the third time. The teacher and a student (peer leader) or two students (two peer leaders) can do the role-play. An example is shown below of a possible refuse, delay and bargain ending.

Refuse: You know I like you very much but I really don’t want to have sex without a condom.
Delay: I think it would be a good idea to wait until you feel less embarrassed about condoms.
Bargain: Maybe we could buy condoms together and I could help you use one.

What the peer leader(s) does

Peer leaders can:

· Be in charge of a small group.
· Role-play the situation.