Cover Image
close this bookA Trainer's Resource Guide (Peace Corps, 1983, 199 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentEvaluation of trainer's resource guide
View the documentPeace Corps training philosophy
View the documentAssumptions underlying the peace corps training philosophy and goals
Open this folder and view contentsStandards for Peace Corps training
Open this folder and view contentsPlanning
View the documentAdministrative checklist
Open this folder and view contentsTraining concepts
View the documentBehavioral objectives
View the documentIntegrated training: Effective volunteer
Open this folder and view contentsTraining evaluation
View the documentPeace Corps: Final training-Evaluation report
View the documentProject training plan
View the documentTraining session plan

Peace Corps: Final training-Evaluation report

THE FOLLOWING IS OFFERED AS A MODEL FOR PREPARING FINAL TRAINING REPORT

OUTLINE

This report will contain the following subject matter:

I. Program Goals and average achievement ratings by trainees or a scale of 1-10.

II. Schedule of events.

III. Specific remarks about how each session progressed.

A. Why or why not suggestions and recommendations were or were not utilized.

B. Observations and recommendations for the future use of each session.

C. Trainee and staff responses to each session.

IV. General comments about the program and recommendations for future.

I. PROGRAM GOALS

Examples of Program Goals:

At the end of training, trainees will be able to:

- Develop basic entry skills for new culture

- Describe roles, relationships and importance of family system to host culture

- Begin to understand the role of the development worker and the skills and attitudes needed

- Understand Peace Corps policies, goals and support systems

- Development information-gathering skills and ability to understand information in cultural context

- Begin to understand and appreciate cultural norms and expectations in host country

- To practice personal health maintenance

- To understand host country history and current political status

SAMPLE ONLY

II. ACTUAL ORIENTATION SCHEDULE AND OVERVIEW

10/31

11/1

11/2

11/3

11/4

11/5

11/6

11/7

11/8

11/9

11/10

11/11

11/12

11/13

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM

AM


Meetings PC

with MO

Introduction comings and goings

History and Social/Political Issues

Information gathering field trip

First Aid & Marine Safety

OFF

Review: Health & Wellness

Information as Devel. Tool Part I: Field Trips to Host

Role of Peace Corps in Host Country

Unmet needs coping, skills, stress, secondary jobs

Dealing with Ambiguity


PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

PM

Trainees arrive general orientation meeting



Needs Assessment (OSM) Goal Agreement

Another perspective on development

REPORT OUTS

Drown-proofing and PICNIC


Case study of a development project & its impact

Information as Devel. Tool Part II: Field Trip Report Outs

C. P. R.

Host Country families, Preparation for family stays

Dealing with Ambiguity






Evening

Evening



Evening



Evening







SEXUAL Customs and Norms

PCV Handbook



Dynamics of Development MARIGOLI



Family Stays



SAMPLE ONLY

III. SPECIFIC SESSIONS:

WHAT TRANSPIRED AND RECOMMENDATIONS

(Note each session should be discussed and evaluated. The following are examples of brief summary statements.)

SESSION 1 :

Needs Assessment (Adaptation of "Cross-Cultural Training Developing a Framework - Session #1 in the Cross-Cultural Manual)

This session began with a discussion of the qualification process and a handout read over lunch by the trainees. The lead trainer then led into OSM by asking "what interesting (most) experiences have you had thus far? before reviewing the cross-cultural learning stages, which were well-received. Lead trainer then explained OSM and gave an example. The staff felt the example explains OSM better and faster than a narrative explanation. Timing was cut short during the scheduled individual and small group tasks because the trainees were particularly hot and tired on this first day of training. The pools and schedule of (name of country) Orientation were also gone over quickly. Although Part II was excluded (open-ended questioning) and the staff was careful about the use of flipcharts and buzz words some trainees still felt it was repetitious of CAST. The trainees rated the information given 3.10 and methods used 3.18 (3.14 overall).

SESSION 2:

Case Study of a Development Project and its Impact (Module #4 in Third World Women Manual

The format used in this session closely parallel the way it appears in the manual. However, the staff was careful not to break the trainees into too many small groups. The recommendations from summer orientation were followed and the five report out questions suggested were used. The staff felt the session went well and was related to (name country) as much as possible.

Trainees response to information given:

1 irrelevant

1 too technical

1 too much time

4 too basic

1 not clear

2 not enough

3 clear

7 repetitive

1 boring

8 interesting

5 useful


On methods used:

1 poorly carried out

4 carried out well

3 flexible

4 well plannes

4 appropriate

3 not well planned

2 helpful/facilitative

6 involved trainee input

2 unhelpful

1 inappropriate

1 too rigid


SAMPLE ONLY

IV. GENERAL COMMENTS ABOUT THE PROGRAM AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE

This section should include all general recommendations concerning the training program as well as logistical arrangements and any special problems encountered during the training program.

Example:

A. A format for post session staff meetings was set up as follows: feedback from observer, discussion of feedback, evaluation and strategies, a look at tomorrow, and pending issues and/or tasks. This format, although not closely during each sessin using the following format: spontaneous notes, methods/procedures notes, content/information notes, training team/trainer notes, and timing notes. This helped to structure staff meetings as well as in gathering data for this final report.

B. The staff felt strongly that one of the strong points of fall orientation was the proper sequence of training sessions and activities. Each day contained some combination of concrete factual sessions, theoretical, conceptual sessions, lectures and discussions, social activities and hands-on learning experiences. Sequencing should be carefully analyzed in planning the schedule of future training.