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close this bookTeaching Conservation in Developing Nations (Peace Corps)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAbout this manual...
View the documentReply form...
View the documentForeword
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 1: The self-contained conservation education center
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 2: Conservation education in a school
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 3: Conservation education in a health center
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 4: Conservation education in an agricultural extension center
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 5: Conservation education in a community center
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix A: Exhibit and study materials
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix B: Nature Trails
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix C: Landscaping
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix D: Signs, labels and guides
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix E: Public facilities
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix F: Live animals
Open this folder and view contentsAppendix G: Endangered species
View the documentSelected organizations concerned with conservation education
View the documentSelected environmental research centers
View the documentGlossary

About this manual...

Teaching Conservation in Developing Nations is a how-to manual. It is designed as a working tool for Peace Corps Volunteers and other development workers: the suggestions which have been presented for conservation education activities or centers can be adapted as appropriate to any job or setting. The purpose of the manual is to help Volunteers and others to incorporate conservation education into their day-to-day community activities, and to suggest resources for those who choose to become more deeply involved in any aspect of environmental education.

The Preparation of Teaching Conservation in Developing Nations has been a cooperative project sponsored jointly by the Peace Corps and the National Audubon Society. The publication was initially undertaken by Ralph R. White and Stephen C. Bass for the National Audubon Society. Mr. White, while a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand, was instrumental in the development of a Nature Education and Wildlife Center for the Royal Thai Forestry Department. He subsequently worked at the National Audubon Society with Mr. Bass, naturalist/planner, and Kathleen R. Rafferty, cartographer/illustrator, to adapt his experience for other centers in developing nations. Their original document was then submitted to the Peace Corps information Collection and Exchange, which undertook to expand and adapt it for broader use, with the assistance of writer/editor Judith Brace and illustrator Anne Brace.

Teaching Conservation in Developing Nations is the seventh manual in the "Appropriate Technologies for Development" series being published by the Peace Corps. Since 1961 Peace corps Volunteers have worked at the grassroots level in countries around the world in program areas such as agriculture, public health, and education. Before beginning their two-year assignments, Volunteers are given training in cross cultural, technical and language skills. This training helps them to live and work closely with the people of their host countries. It helps them to live and work closely with the people of their host countries. It helps them, too, to approach development problems with new ideas that make use of locally available resources and that are appropriate to the local cultures.

Recently the Peace Corps established an information Collection and Exchange so that these ideas developed during service in the field could be made available to the wide range of development workers who might find them useful. Materials from the field are now being collected, reviewed, and classified in the information Collection and Exchange system. The most useful materials are being shared as widely as possible. The information Collection and Exchange provides an important source of field-based research materials for the production of ''Appropriate Technologies for Development" manuals such as Teaching Conservation in Developing Nations.

Note to the Reader
Due to the high demand for this publication, it has been reprinted without revision (e.g., selected organizations). Updates to the manual are now in progress.
- May 1997

Contributors...

Judith Brace, co-author of Teaching Conservation in Developing Nations, has written and edited a variety of reports and articles on conservation, environmental planning, and urban affairs. She has also conducted research projects in comparative education in several developing nations.

Ralph R. White served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Thailand, where he worked with the Royal Thai Forestry Department. He subsequently worked at the National Audubon Society, and co-authored the manual, based on his experiences in Thailand.

Stephen C. Bass, who helped to research and co-author the manual, has served as a naturalist/planner for the National Audubon Society Nature Center Planning Division.

Anne Brace, who provided the illustrations for the manual, is currently studying at Scripps College, Claremont, California. Ms. Brace has provided illustrations for a variety of publications; her most recent work is in the field of animation.

Kathleen R. Rafferty, who prepared the special display illustrations for the manual, is a cartographer for the National Audubon Society Nature Center Planning Division.

Many thanks are also due to Brian Bedell and William J. Manly of the National Audubon Society, James A. Sherburne of the Smithsonian institute, and Richard A. Saunier of the inter-American Development Bank, for their technical review of materials in this publication.