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close this bookDisaster Preparedness - 2nd Edition (DHA/UNDRO - DMTP - UNDP, 1994, 66 p.)
close this folderPART 1 - Planning for disaster preparedness
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentVulnerability assessment
View the documentPlanning
View the documentInstitutional structure
View the documentInformation systems
View the documentResource base
View the documentWarning systems
View the documentResponse mechanisms
View the documentPublic education and training
View the documentRehearsals
View the documentCASE STUDY
View the documentSUMMARY

Rehearsals

Disaster Preparedness Framework

Vulnerability
assessment

Planning

Institutional
Framework

Information
Systems

Resource
Base

Warning
Systems

Response
Mechanisms

Public Education
and Training

Rehearsals

As with most simulations, disaster preparedness rehearsals cannot portray the full dynamics and chaos of a disaster relief operation. However, this is no excuse for avoiding the need to rehearse the disaster preparedness plan. Rehearsals will reemphasize points made in separate training programs, and test the system as a whole. Rehearsals invariably expose gaps that otherwise might be overlooked.

Rehearsals must be conducted system-wide and taken seriously. System-wide means that all the components which would be involved in a real disaster situation, from central to local authorities, should be rehearsed. Be forewarned that cynicism and halfheartedness may dog the rehearsal. You must persevere, because it is the nearest anyone will get, until disaster strikes, to seeing if the plan is effective. Rehearsals are also the only way to keep plans fresh, especially during extended periods without disasters.

A two-day exercise held in November 1982 in Yugoslavia simulated an emergency at the Krsko nuclear power plant.5 More than 70,000 people took part, including 8,000 officials in off-site and on-site response groups and organizations. As part of the exercise, one village in the vicinity of the plant was selected to demonstrate full-scale evacuation, and people in a wider area were told to take shelter. Precautions were taken to prevent contamination of the food supply; tire-fighting demonstrations were held under full radiological contamination control; decontamination facilities were set up, and traffic controls were established.

5 Office of the United Nations Disaster Relief Coordinator, Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, Volume 11, Preparedness Aspects, United Nations, New York, 1984, p. 101.

WHEN DISASTER STRIKES
HERE’S WHAT TO DO

VIOLENT EARTHQUAKE
(When it is difficult to stand or walk)

IMMEDIATE ACTION

Indoors:

Get the family into doorways, or under tables; bedridden folk under beds; keep away from windows and chimneys. Do NOT rush outside.

Outdoors:

Keep clear of buildings, high walls, or dangling electric wires. Downtown, shelter under archways or doorways but do NOT re-enter damaged buildings.

Driving:

If you can feel the earthquake when driving, it is serious. Pull off the road, stop and stay in the car.

AS SOON AS YOU CAN

Put out all domestic fires and heaters

Turn off at mains electricity, gas, home heating oil and water if you suspect that house has been damaged.

Leave the house if a fire starts that you cannot put out at once.

Leave the house if you detect a gas leak after turning it off at the mains.

Open all doors and windows.

Save water in tanks and cisterns. Fill your emergency containers.

Leave the fridge shut as much as possible if power has failed.

Free dogs and cats.

Follow your Civil Defence
checklist - back cover.

Listen to the radio for information and advice.

Disconnect all electrical appliances and move all valuable personal and household goods, food, and clothing out of reach of water if you are warned or if you suspect that flood waters may reach the house.

Prevent dangerous pollution - move weedkillers and insecticides out of reach of the water.

Turn off electricity, home

heating oil and gas if you have to leave the house.

Lock all outside doors and windows if you have to leave the house.

Do NOT enter floodwater on foot or in a car if it can be avoided. Never wander around a flood area on your own.

Follow your Civil Defence
checklist - back cover.

TSUNAMI (Commonly called Tidal Waves)

If you are in low lying areas near to the sea or estuary:

Listen to the radio for information and advice.

Act as for floods.

Move to high ground or 500 metres inland if tsunami warning is given.

Keep away from streams flowing into the sea.

Never go down to the beach. If you see a wave it will be too late to escape it.

Follow your Civil Defence checklist
- back cover.

Listen to the radio for information and advice. Allow considerable margin for safety. Storm may change direction, speed or intensity within a few hours.

Preparation - If storm force winds or severe gales are forecast for your area:

Store or secure loose boards, corrugated iron, rubbish tins or anything else that could become a missile.

Tape up large picture windows.

Follow your Civil Defence checklist
- back cover.

When the Storm Hits

Stay indoors and shelter in strongest part of the house.

Listen to the radio and follow instructions.

Open windows on sheltered side of house if roof begins to lift.

Find shelter if in the open

VOLCANIC ACTIVITY

Listen to the radio for information and advice

Find shelter but NOT in a building with a low pitched roof if heavy ash is falling. Avoid basements or confined spaces where gases may accumulate.

Move to a ridgeline if you are in the open. Keep well above the shoreline of large lakes.

Wear substantial covering over your head and body if you have to move in an ash shower. Breathe through a handkerchief, carry a torch even if it is daytime and move as quickly as you can away from the eruption.

Follow your Civil Defence
checklist - back cover.

KNOW WHAT YOU HAVE TO DO BEFORE YOU HAVE TO DO IT

P. D. HASSELBERG. GOVERNMENT PRINTER. WELLINGTON. NEW ZEALAND-1981