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close this bookThe Challenge of Universal Primary Education - Strategies for achieving the international development targets (DFID, 2001, 49 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentDepartment for International Development
View the documentForeword by the Secretary of State
View the documentExecutive summary
Open this folder and view contents1. Target statement
Open this folder and view contents2. Defining the challenge
Open this folder and view contents3. Experience to date
Open this folder and view contents4. Meeting the challenge
Open this folder and view contents5. Priorities for DFID
Open this folder and view contents6. Monitoring progress
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexes
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Department for International Development

The Department for International Development (DFID) is the British government department responsible for promoting development and the reduction of poverty. The government elected in May 1997 increased its commitment to development by strengthening the department and increasing its budget.

The policy of the government was set out in its first White Paper on International Development, published in November 1997. The central focus of the policy is a commitment to the internationally agreed target to halve the proportion of people living in extreme poverty by 2015, together with the associated targets including basic health care provision and universal access to primary education by the same date. The government’s second White Paper on International Development, published in December 2000, reaffirmed this commitment, while focusing specifically on how to manage the process of globalisation to benefit poor people.

DFID seeks to work in partnership with governments which are committed to the international targets, and seeks to work with business, civil society and the research community to encourage progress which will help reduce poverty. We also work with multilateral institutions including the World Bank, United Nations agencies and the European Commission. The bulk of our assistance is concentrated on the poorest countries in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

We are also contributing to poverty elimination and sustainable development in middle income countries, and helping the transition countries in Central and Eastern Europe to try to ensure that the widest number of people benefit from the process of change.

As well as its headquarters in London and East Kilbride, DFID has offices in New Delhi, Bangkok, Dhaka, Kathmandu, Nairobi, Dar-es-Salaam, Kampala, Harare, Abuja, Pretoria, Maputo, Lilongwe, Lusaka, Beijing, Suva, Bridgetown, and Montserrat. In other parts of the world, DFID works through staff based in British embassies and high commissions.

Department for International Development
January 2001