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close this bookThe News Media and Humanitarian Action - 1st Edition (DHA/UNDRO - DMTP - UNDP, 1997, 122 p.)
close this folderPart 2. Analysis of media influence and recommendations for crisis triangle institutions
View the document(introduction...)
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 5. Analyzing media influence
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 6. Case studies
Open this folder and view contentsChapter 7. Better policy, better action, better coverage

(introduction...)

This part provides a framework for analyzing media influence on policymaking and humanitarian action and provides recommendations on how each institution can function more effectively and cooperatively in the humanitarian sphere. Chapter 5 presents an analytical framework which should be applied to the case studies presented in Chapter 6.

The case studies represent a cross-section of post-Cold War crises and exhibit varying degrees of coverage by the media, attention by government policymakers, and action by humanitarian organizations. Since the cases fit no simple classification scheme, they are presented roughly in chronological order. The Liberia and Sudan case studies have received relatively sparse media coverage and exhibited little media-policy interaction. These two “obscure” crises stand in stark contrast to the others.

At the end of each case study you will be asked questions to help you reflect on and analyze the case study information. These questions will require that you recall information provided in Part 1. In addition you should think about the framework for analyzing media influence (presented in Chapter 5) as you read the case studies. You are encouraged to bring your own experience to bear in this analysis. You may also want to analyze cases other than those reviewed here.

The discussion and analysis of the case studies point to changes which can improve coverage by the news media, policy of governments, and action by humanitarian organizations. In Chapter 7, therefore, we propose ways in which each set of institutions can function more effectively and cooperatively in the humanitarian sphere, while not losing sight of its own primary objectives.