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close this bookTrees and their Management (IIRR, 1992, 195 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentMessage
View the documentProceedings of the workshop
View the documentList of participants
View the documentCurrent program thrusts in upland development
View the documentTrees and their management
View the documentSustainable agroforest land technology (Salt-3)
View the documentOutplanting seedlings
View the documentTree pruning and care
View the documentBagging of young fruits
View the documentEstablishing bamboo farms
View the documentPhilippine bamboo species: Their characteristics, uses and propagation
View the documentGrowing rattan
View the documentGrowing anahaw
View the documentGrowing buri
View the documentShelterbelts
View the documentBank stabilization
View the documentAssessing the usefulness of indigenous and locally adapted trees for agroforestry
View the documentA guide for the inventory, identification and screening of native plant species with potential for agroforestry
View the documentFruit trees for harsh environments
View the documentCitrus production
View the documentJackfruit production
View the documentMango production
View the documentMiddle to high understory shade tolerant crops
View the documentLow understory shade-tolerant crops
View the documentConserving available fuelwood

Shelterbelts

Shelterbelts or windbreaks are strips of vegetation composed of trees, shrubs and vines to protect croplands from destructive winds. When established on hills, they can also act as buffer strips to minimize soil erosion. Along rivers, streams or creeks, they serve as a bank protection along farm borders, they serve as live fence and firebreaks. Shelterbelts also serve as source of agroforestry products.

Shelterbelts/windbreaks are recommended particularly in the eastern portion and other areas in the country frequently visited by typhoons.

COMPOSITION OF SHELTERBELTS

Properly established shelterbelts should be dense in their lower part and more open in the middle and upper parts. The vegetative mixture of a good shelterbelt is approximately 65 percent shrubs and vines and 35 percent tall and medium-sized trees.


Shelterbelts

CHARACTERlSTlCS OF SPECIES FOR SHELTERBELTS

In choosing species to be used in shelterbelts, the following should be considered:

1. The species should be wind-resistant.
2. It must have a deep and well-spread root system.
3. It must have a small crown and light branching habit.
4. Easy to propagate and maintain.
5. Ability to coppice.
6. Can provide other economic benefits, like food, fodder, etc.

POINTERS IN ESTABLISHING SHELTERBELTS

1. The strips should be more or less perpendicular to the main wind direction; on sloping land, the strips should follow more or less the contour lines.

2. The number of rows in the strips largely depends on the velocity of the wind. The higher the velocity, the broader the strip. Usually, the strip for shelterbelts is 1-5 rows.

3. The first and the last rows should be planted mainly to shrubs and the central rows, a combination of tall and medium-sized trees planted in small clusters of 2-5 plants of the same species.

4. Use the quincunx (triangular) method at 1 m distance between tree/shrubs.

5. In areas with high wind velocity, the shelterbelts should be about 100 m apart and about 200-300 meters in ordinary conditions


Pointers in establishing shelterbelts

SUGGESTED SPECIES FOR SHELTERBELTS

TABLE 5. TALL TREES/PALM M (over 15 m)

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME

Anahau

Livistona rotundifolia

Mangium

Acacia mangium

Agoho

Casuarina equisetifolia

Akleng parang

Albizia procera

Narra

Pterocarpus indicus

Kamachile

Pithecellobium dulce

Teak

Tectona grandis

Kamagong

Diospyros philippinenses

Gmelina

Gmelina arborea

Thailand shower

Cassia siamea

Molave

Vitex parviflora

Niyog

Cocos nucifera

Antipolo

Artocarpus blancoi

Caribbean pine

Pinus caribaea

Santol

Sandoricum koetjape

Buri

Corypha elate

Sampalok

Tamarindus indica

Durian

Durio zibethenus

TABLE 6. MEDIUM-SIZED TREES/PALM (5-15 m).

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME

COMMON NAME

Caimito

Chrysophyllum cainito

Agoho del Monte

Casuarina rumphiana

Chico

Manilkara

Duhat zapota

Syzygium cumini

Kasoy

Anacaridum occidentale

Neem

Azadirachta indica

Banaba

Lagerstroemia speciosa

Dapdap

Erythrina orientalis

Ipil-ipil

Leucaena leucocephala

Alibang-bang

Piliostigma malabaricum

Kakauwate

Gliricidia sepium

Pili

Anacardium ovatum

TABLE 7 SHRUBS (up to 5 m) AND BAMBOOS.

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME

Kawayan tinik

Bambusa blumeana

Kawayan kiling

Bambusa vulgaris

Kawayan

Bambusa spinosa

Bolo

Gigantochloa levis

Boho

Schizostachyum lumampao

Aroma

Acacia farnesiana

Bougainvillea

Bougainvillea spectabilis

Kadios

Cajanus cajan

Achuete

Bixa orellana

References:

Hensleigh, T.E. Agroforestry Species for the Philippines, U.S. Peace Corps.

Wiedelt, H.J. 1976. Manual of Reforestation and Erosion Control for the Philippines, GTZ, West Germany.