Cover Image
close this bookTrees and their Management (IIRR, 1992, 195 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentMessage
View the documentProceedings of the workshop
View the documentList of participants
View the documentCurrent program thrusts in upland development
View the documentTrees and their management
View the documentSustainable agroforest land technology (Salt-3)
View the documentOutplanting seedlings
View the documentTree pruning and care
View the documentBagging of young fruits
View the documentEstablishing bamboo farms
View the documentPhilippine bamboo species: Their characteristics, uses and propagation
View the documentGrowing rattan
View the documentGrowing anahaw
View the documentGrowing buri
View the documentShelterbelts
View the documentBank stabilization
View the documentAssessing the usefulness of indigenous and locally adapted trees for agroforestry
View the documentA guide for the inventory, identification and screening of native plant species with potential for agroforestry
View the documentFruit trees for harsh environments
View the documentCitrus production
View the documentJackfruit production
View the documentMango production
View the documentMiddle to high understory shade tolerant crops
View the documentLow understory shade-tolerant crops
View the documentConserving available fuelwood

Message

Agroforestry, the land management system of incorporating crop production with tree and/or livestock production, evolved to become one of the most widely promoted tools for sustaining development in the uplands. To supplement the materials used by upland development extension workers in promoting agroforestry, a group of specialists, technicians and farmers from 11 government and nongovernment organizations met at the invitation of the International Institute of Rural Reconstruction in Silang, Cavite in November 1989 to develop the Agroforestry Technology Information Kit(ATIK). In November 1992, some of the specialists, together with some farmers and an additional number of specialists and technicians, met again at IIRR to revise the ATIK.

The updated kit is handy, easy-to-understand and full of illustrations. It widely uses indigenous technologies. With this kit, it is hoped that extension workers and upland dwellers develop a better understanding and appreciation of agroforestry. The success of agroforestry as a tool for sustaining upland development, however, will depend on how this tool is introduced and implemented. Sustainable agroforestry systems can only be attained if upland dwellers are involved in the planning and establishment of such systems.

I commend all those involved in the production of this useful kit.

Angel C. Alcala Secretary Department of Environment and Natural Resources