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close this bookFact sheet No 102: Lymphatic Filariasis - Rev. September 2000 (WHO, 2000, 3 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentCause
View the documentTransmission
View the documentSigns and Symptoms
View the documentDiagnosis
View the documentTreatment
View the documentWHO's Strategy to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis
View the documentEconomic and Social Impact

(introduction...)

Rev. September 2000

Lymphatic Filariasis, known as Elephantiasis, puts at risk more than a billion people in more than 80 countries. Over 120 million have already been affected by it, over 40 million of them are seriously incapacitated and disfigured by the disease. One-third of the people infected with the disease live in India, one third are in Africa and most of the remainder are in South Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. In tropical and subtropical areas where lymphatic filariasis is well-established, the prevalence of infection is continuing to increase. A primary cause of this increase is the rapid and unplanned growth of cities, which creates numerous breeding sites for the mosquitoes that transmit the disease.

In its most obvious manifestations, lymphatic filariasis causes enlargement of the entire leg or arm, the genitals, vulva and breasts. In endemic communities, 10-50% of men and up to 10% of women can be affected. The psychological and social stigma associated with these aspects of the disease are immense. In addition, even more common than the overt abnormalities is hidden, internal damage to the kidneys and lymphatic system caused by the filariae.