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close this bookSchool Health Education to Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) : Students' Activities (UNESCO - WHO, 1994, 79 p.)
close this folderUnit 3: Responsible Behaviour: Protected Sex
View the documentThe condom
View the documentArguments people use against using condoms
View the documentHow to use a condom (explanation/demonstration)
View the documentCondom practice
View the documentNo to unprotected sex (demonstration)
View the documentNo to unprotected sex (class participation)
View the documentNo to unprotected sex (individual participation)

The condom

Why?

For sexually active people, the condom is the best protection against STD and HIV. Information about condoms is important for positive attitudes and effective use.

How?

Your teacher will discuss these points with you.


Figure

Arguments people use against using condoms

Why?

Your partner may not like using condoms. If you want to be safe from STD, HIV and pregnancy it is important to learn how to talk to a person who dislikes using condoms.

How?

For every argument against using condoms choose the best response from the list of three. Place the letter in the circle after “Arguments against”.

Arguments against

Answer

Responses

1. You think I have a disease.

a) I don’t want either of us to take a chance of getting HIV.
b) You know many people infected with HIV have no symptoms at all.
c) We probably don’t have a disease, but isn’t it better to be sure?

2. But condoms don’t work.

a) They’re OK if we use them the right way.
b) Will you try condoms a few times and see?
c) They are the best protection available.

3. They spoil the mood.

a) It won’t be so bad after we get used to them.
b) Hey, condoms may even be fun.
c) We can use them together.

4. They don’t feel good.

a) It will be OK once we’re used to them.
b) Will you try condoms a few times and see?
c) But it would make me feel more relaxed if I felt safe.

5. They make me feel cheap and dirty.

a) But we know condoms can protect us.
b) I know you don’t like the idea but condoms are so important now.
c) Anyone can get HIV, even people like us.

6. I’m already using pills for birth control.

a) We’ll have to use condoms as well, the pill doesn’t protect us from infections.
b) That doesn’t help against HIV and STD.
c) Too bad - no condom, no sex.

7. I’d be embarrassed to buy one.

a) It won’t be so awkward after the first time.
b) I’ll buy them, so we’ll have them next time.
c) Embarrassment never killed anyone.

8. I don’t have one with me.

a) I’ll get one for next time, but today, no sex.
b) Sorry - no condom, no sex.
c) I don’t want either of us to take a chance of getting AIDS.

9. It’s against my religion.

a) Sorry - no condom, no sex.
b) There are all kinds of things we can do without having sex.
c) Well, maybe we’re not ready for sex.

10. They cost too much.

a) Sorry, I really care about my health and yours.
b) I can help you pay for them.
c) Let’s not have sex until we can work this out.

How to use a condom (explanation/demonstration)

Why?

Condoms offer good protection and are unlikely to break, if you know how to use them properly.

How?

Your teacher will give you instructions on how to do this activity.

1. Check the expiry date.
Store condoms in a cool, dry place.

2. Open package carefully so condom does not tear.

3. Make sure condom is pointing in right direction. Do not unroll condom before putting it on.

4. Squeeze tip of condom.

5. Still holding tip, unroll condom until it covers all of erect penis.

6. After intercourse and ejaculation, hold rim of condom and pull penis out before it gets soft.

7. Dispose of condom in a safe place.
Use a new condom next time.

Condom practice

Why?

In this voluntary activity, you can practise putting a condom on a model of a penis (or on a banana or cucumber). This may be an activity that you don’t want to do. It is perfectly alright for you to refuse. Whatever your decision, remember that this activity may be helpful some time in the future when you may want to use a condom.

How?

After the activity below, complete the “Teacher asks” section with your small group.

1 With your teacher, read Student activity 3.3, “How to use a condom”.

2 Observe a demonstration of how to put the condom on a model penis.

3 In a small group, observe a student demonstrating how to use a condom. Another student should read the instructions for each step on “How to use a condom” (Student activity 3.3).

4 Each student will be given one packaged condom. Observe the type of packaging and the information on the outside of the condom wrapper. Note the expiry date. Open the condom wrapper carefully. Observe how easy it is to open the package; the colour, shape; and lubrication (if any).

5 If you are comfortable with the activity, practise putting the condom on the model. Other group members will help you by either reading each step for you or by judging how you did after you have finished putting the condom on (you should tell them which you would like before you start).

6 Continue these instructions until everyone in your group has had a chance to practise putting the condom on the model.

Teacher asks

1. Discuss problems that might occur if you were to use a condom with a partner in a real life situation (e.g. not being able to see in the dark);

2. Which was the most difficult part for you? How could you make it easier?

No to unprotected sex (demonstration)

Why?

Being assertive when your partner does not want to use a condom is very important. The bottom line is “no sex without a condom”.

How?

This situation will show you how to deal with a person who does not want to use a condom. This is done using the assertive skills you learned earlier.

“We’re both clean... We don’t need to use a condom!”


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No to unprotected sex (class participation)

Why?

Being assertive when your partner does not want to use a condom is very important. The bottom line is “no sex without a condom”.

How?

This situation will show you how to deal with a person who does not want to use a condom. This is done using the assertive skills you learned earlier.

“I’d be embarrassed to use a condom.”


Figure

No to unprotected sex (individual participation)

Why?

Being assertive when your partner does not want to use a condom is very important. The bottom line is “no sex without a condom”.

How?

This situation will show you how to deal with a person who does not want to use a condom. This is done using the assertive skills you learned earlier.

“I don’t have a condom. Let’s do it just this once.”


Figure