Cover Image
close this bookManagement Self-Development - A Guide for Managers, Organisations and Institutions (ILO, 1985, 282 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentManagement Development Series
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderChapter 1. Self-development: What and why
View the document1.1 Why should you read this book?
View the document1.2 What is self-development?
View the document1.3 Self-development processes
View the document1.4 Why is self-development needed?
View the document1.5 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 2. Self-assessment and planning one's own future
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View the document2.1 The self-assessment process
View the document2.2 Our higher and lower selves
View the document2.3 Obtaining information about yourself and your performance
View the document2.4 Clarifying the questions and issues facing you
View the document2.5 A self-development plan
View the document2.6 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 3. Methods and resources for self-development
View the document3.1 Selecting methods and resources
View the document3.2 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 4. Some fundamental methods
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View the document4.1 Method 1: Personal journal
View the document4.2 Method 2: Backwards review
View the document4.3 Method 3: Reflecting on things that happen
View the document4.4 Method 4: Listening to your inner self and self-counselling; the development of intuition
View the document4.5 Method 5: Courage to try out new things
View the document4.6 Method 6: Experimenting with new behaviours
View the document4.7 Method 7: Improving your will-power
View the document4.8 Method 8: Keeping an open mind
View the document4.9 Method 9: Working with your higher and lower selves
View the document4.10 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 5. Some ways of improving your thinking
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View the document5.1 Method 10: Reading
View the document5.2 Method 11: Note taking
View the document5.3 Method 12: Repertory grid
View the document5.4 Method 13: Ways of remembering things
View the document5.5 Method 14: Improving your ability to think logically
View the document5.6 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 6. Some other opportunities for self-development
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View the document6.1 Method 15: Courses, including correspondence courses
View the document6.2 Method 16: Packages and programmed texts
View the document6.3 Method 17: Special projects
View the document6.4 Method 18: Joining associations and professional bodies
View the document6.5 Method 19: Writing for journals
View the document6.6 Method 20: Training and teaching others
View the document6.7 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 7. Physical fitness, relaxation and other aspects of the self
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View the document7.1 Method 21: Working with physical fitness, relaxation and meditation
View the document7.2 Method 22: Working with your size, shape, and appearance
View the document7.3 Method 23: Working with people who are different
View the document7.4 Method 24: Working with your temperaments
View the document7.5 Method 25: Working with your managerial style
View the document7.6 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 8. How other people can help your self-development
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View the document8.1 Method 26: Working with a speaking partner
View the document8.2 Method 27: Group approaches
View the document8.3 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 9. Promoting management self-development within an organisation
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View the document9.1 The role of management self-development in improving your organisation
View the document9.2 Motivating people for a programme of management self-development
View the document9.3 Creating resources and conditions for self-development
View the document9.4 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderChapter 10. What can institutions do to encourage self-development?
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View the document10.1 The institution's philosophy and policy
View the document10.2 Teaching and training activities
View the document10.3 Research and advice
View the document10.4 Developmental materials and physical resources
View the document10.5 Suggestions for further reading
close this folderAppendices
View the documentAppendix 1. Obtaining information for self-assessment
View the documentAppendix 2. Questionnaire based on the qualities of an effective manager
View the documentAppendix 3. Questionnaire based on the outcome of self-development
View the documentAppendix 4. Feedback from your whole life: Biography work
View the documentAppendix 5. Summary of selected methods of data collection for organisational analysis
View the documentAppendix 6. Developmental relationships questionnaire
View the documentAppendix 7. Guidelines for running development groups
View the documentAppendix 8. Questionnaire to identify development needs
View the documentAppendix 9. Outline of short introductory courses on self-development
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack cover

2.3 Obtaining information about yourself and your performance

There are many ways of obtaining information about yourself and your performance, and it is clearly impossible to describe all of these in a short publication like this one. Four particularly useful ways have been selected and described in detail in appendices 1 to 4. They are

- feedback from other people;
- things that happen ("critical incidents");
- questionnaires for self-analysis;
- looking at the whole of your life, its themes, meaning and purpose ("biography").

You are not expected to go through each of these ways in turn. In fact, to do it like that would probably be unhelpful, as you would get worn out and bogged down. No. The point of describing a few methods is to give you a choice. We suggest that you briefly look over all the methods, and then choose one that appeals to you most. If you really want to, you can of course do more than one, but it is quite likely that you will want to come back and try another some time later.

Do not forget; these are ways of obtaining information about yourself and your performance, which is only the first part of the self-assessment process (figure 6).

After doing one of the methods, you should then ask yourself, "what is this feedback saying to me? What questions or issues are coming my way?" A method for doing this is described in each case.

It might be helpful to give a few examples of what we mean by "issues or questions" - although it is important that you realise that these are only examples. Your own might well be very different. Anyway, here are some:

- my boss: he is asking me "how committed are you to the work of this department?"

- my boss: I want to know how I can get him to let me have more freedom to take initiatives;

- my ambition in life: do I want promotion and material rewards, or a happy family life? Can I have both?

- my ability to sell things: how can I use this to best advantage?

- my poor listening skills: is there anything I can do to improve them?

- my impatience: what can I do about the fact that I get impatient, then angry, when things seem to take longer than I expected?

- my temper: I am often rude to people on the telephone; what can I do about this?

- my wife: she is asking me "is it really necessary for you to go overseas to study for 12 months?"