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close this bookWorkshop to Produce an Information Kit on Farmer-proven. Integrated Agriculture-aquaculture Technologies (IIRR, 1992, 119 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentWorkshop of participants
View the documentBibliography on integrated farming
close this folderEconomic, sociocultural and environmental considerations in introducing integrated agriculture-aquaculture technology
View the documentSociocultural considerations when introducing a new integrated agriculture - aquaculture technology
View the documentEconomic considerations in introducing integrated agriculture-aquaculture technologies
View the documentWorking with new entrants to integrated agriculture -aquaculture
View the documentIntegrated agriculture-aquaculture and the environment
close this folderIntegrated farming systems
View the documentIntegrated grass-fish farming systems in China
View the documentChinese embankment fish culture
View the documentThe V.A.C. system in northern Vietnam
View the documentFodder-fish integration practice in Malaysia
View the documentIndian integrated fish-horticulture vegetable farming
View the documentCulture of short-cycle species in seasonal ponds and ditches of Bangladesh
close this folderAnimal-fish system
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntegrated fish-duck farming
View the documentIntegrated poultry-fish farming
View the documentIntegrated fish-pig farming (1000 sq meter unit: India)
View the documentBackyard integrated pig-fish culture (100-150 sq m unit: philippines)
close this folderRice-fish systems
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentLow-input rice-fish farming system in irrigated areas in Malaysia
View the documentRice-fish systems in Indonesia
View the documentSawah Tambak rice-fish system in Indonesia
View the documentRice-fish systems in China
View the documentRice-fish system in Guimba, Hueva Ecija, Philippines
View the documentThe case of rice-fish farmer mang isko,dasmarinas, cavite, the Philippines
close this folderManagement for rice-fish
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentSite selection: where to culture fish with rice'
View the documentPreparation of field for Rich - fish culture
View the documentStocking for rice-fish culture
View the documentFeeding and maintenance in rice-fish system
View the documentRice management in rice-fish culture
View the documentRice-fish benefits and problems
View the documentThe rice-fish ecosystem
View the documentFish as a component of integrated pest management (ipm) in rice production
close this folderFish management and feeding
View the documentUsing animal wastes in fish ponds
View the documentSewage-fed fish
View the documentBiogas slurry in fish culture
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close this folderFish breeding and nursing
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentCarp breeding using off- season wheat fields
View the documentNursery system for carp species
View the documentFry nursing in rice-fish systems
View the documentFingerling production in irrigated paddy

Fingerling production in irrigated paddy

Fish fingerlings supply is scarce in Northern Bangladesh. It is usually expensive and laborious for fish farmers to procure fish seeds. The production of common carp (Cyprlnus carpio) fingerlings with different types of "boro" or irrigated paddy is an alternative. Although production figures are below the commercial rates, small farmers can grow their own fingerlings at minimal cost.

The four types of irrigated paddies for fingerling production (as practiced by poor farmers in Northern Bangladesh) the have following features:

soil

:clay loam

fish species: Common carp

water supply

:irrigated

rice variety: Bangladesh Rice

water depth

:maintained at7.5 -10 cm

(BR) 3, BR -8 , BR-9, BR-14, Tayap and China Pajam.

area range

:12.5 - 1,320 sq m



Fingerling production in irrigated paddy

ADVANTAGES

1. Fish hatchlings or fry can be reared in different types of "boro" paddy plot designs without altering farmer's normal practices in rice production.

2. Farmers' existing resources can be used.

3. Only minimum additional expenses are required.

4. When the fish get bigger than one inch, they control weeds, pests and insects in the paddy.

5. Fish feces serve as fertilizer for rice.

6. Can provide additional income.

7. Farmers can sell fingerlings when prices are highest.

CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES IN FISH PRODUCTION


Paddy preparation


Transplanting rice


Apply Sumithion to kill predators d.25 mg/sq m


Stock with 2-week old fingerlings at 10/sq m


Monitor fingerling growth by weighing, done in weekly intervals. Maintain water depth at 7-10 cm in the paddy.


Harvest the fingerlings. Condition them in hapa before selling, or stock them for further growth.

Note: Apply pesticides for the rice crop only if needed. Malathion (suggested rate 27 ml/1000 sq m) has been shown to cause the least harm to fish. Deweed along paddy embankments to remove breeding places of and sheiter for predators.

WHAT TO CONSIDER BEFORE ADAPTING THE TECHNOLOGY

1.Paddy soil should have good water - holding capacity

2. Common carp is recommended for stoking:

- spawns earlier;
- fries are available at the same time as “boro” rice transplantation
- hardy fish

Tilapia can also be stocked.

3. Fish have higher survival rates in smaller paddies.

4. It possible, use fry (instead of hatchlings) for stocking because they have higher survival rates.

5. Use of supplementary feed, like fine bran or wheat bran, can help increase fingerling production at very minimum cost.

6. To reduce risks of paddy field drying out, use treadle pumps.

Production details between stock of fry and hatchlings (based on 1,320 sq m paddy).


FRY

HATCHLINGS

Stocking rate/sq m

10

40

Stocking (#)

13200

52800

Survival rate (%)

40

5

Growth Cycle (days)

42

60

Yield (#)

5280

2673

Partial budget for common carp fingerling production in boro paddy (based on 1,320 sq m paddy).


FRY

HATCHLINGS

COSTS

1075.64

4;20

Fry costs at Tk. 0.08/u

1056

-

-Hatchlings cost at Tk. 00875/unit

-

462.00

-Family Labor

-


-Interest on operating cost (16% per annum)

19.64

12.20

Income Return



(Fingerlings Tk. 0.5/unit)

2640

1336.50

BALANCE

1564.36

862.30

Comparative budget and income from 3 systems: rice; rice and common-carp hatchlngs' and, rice and common carp fry.


Rice only

Rice and Hatchilngs

Rice and Fry

· Rice production




Cost




Inputs

684

601

601

Labor

492

509

509

Irrigation charges




(Tk. 500/bigha)

500

500

500

Interest on operating costs16% per annum(1.33 % /day)

89

85

85

Income

3855

3943

39¢3

Return for Rice

2090

2248

2248

· Fingerling Production:




Fingerlings (Tk. 0.50/pc.)




Cost

NA



Fish


462

1056

Family Labor




Interest on operating costs16% per annum (1.33% day


12

20

Income NA

NA

1337

2640

Return for Fish

NA

863

1564

Return for Plot

2090

3111

3812

Records from CARE/ODA/BRAC Rice/Fish Pilot Project. Rangpur 1991

1 US$ = Taka 38

1,320 sq m = 1 bigha, a standard area measurement used in Bangladesh.

Prepared by: FRRANCISCO NOBLE

FARMER-PROVEN INTEGRATED AGRICULTURE-AQUACULTURE
A TECHNOLOGY INFORMATION KIT (IIRR-ICLARM)