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close this bookSchool Health Education to Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) : Teachers' Guide (UNESCO - WHO, 1994, 117 p.)
close this folderUnit 3. Responsible behaviour: protected sex
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 The condom - Information about the condom
View the document2 Arguments people use against using condoms - How to deal with a partner who is negative about condom use
View the document3 How to use a condom - Humorous explanation about condom use
View the documentCondom practice - Students practice putting a condom on a model
View the document5 No to unprotected sex (demonstration) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document6 No to unprotected sex (class participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document7 No to unprotected sex (individual participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom

(introduction...)


Figure

1 The condom - Information about the condom

Purpose

Information about condoms is necessary for effective use.

What the teacher does

1. Provide an activity sheet for each student or read the questions and answers to the students.

2. Emphasis should be placed on the fact that condoms are strong, safe, sensitive and easy to use.

Remind students that Vaseline and other oil-based lubricants should not be used as they weaken latex condoms. Only water-based lubricants such as KY-jelly, glycerin, egg white, spermicidal jelly or foam, MuKo and Lubafax should be used.

3. Ask if there are any questions about condoms and provide answers if you can. If not, tell the students you will find the answer for the next day.

2 Arguments people use against using condoms - How to deal with a partner who is negative about condom use

Purpose

A person may be very positive about condom use but may have a partner who does not like condoms and doesn’t want to use them. It is important to learn how to talk to a person who dislikes using condoms.

What the teacher does

1. Decide how you will use this activity.

a) Provide an activity sheet for each student in the class and have them work individually or in pairs to complete the instructions.

b) Read the “Arguments against” and give the three responses to the argument. Students choose what they think is the best response and write down the letter of the response (only one activity sheet is needed).

c) Place the students in small groups and have the students make a group decision on the best response (one sheet per group is needed).

2. Ask for responses to each argument. It is best if you can have one student make the argument and another read their chosen response. For example, one student would say, “They spoil the mood”, and the other responds, “Hey, condoms may even be fun”.

3 How to use a condom - Humorous explanation about condom use

Purpose

One of the most important factors in condom failure is inexperience with its proper use. Therefore, a demonstration of its actual use is important.

What the teacher does

· The teacher should explain to students that at first they might feel awkward but that these feelings pass with practice. If something humorous occurs, enjoy the moment (but don’t accept put-downs).

· The teacher should inform the class that this is an optional activity. However, he/she should indicate to students that the reason for doing this activity is to acquire a skill that may be needed in the future. It is not taught to encourage sex and it is not an invitation to seek sex.

· It may be difficult for students to volunteer for this activity. To avoid embarrassment, it is suggested that the teacher select one or two students (or the peer leaders) to practise. The rest of the class can practise afterwards.

· Give support and positive feedback to the students practicing using a condom.

Condom practice - Students practice putting a condom on a model

1. Decide how to teach this activity.

a) Provide each student with an activity sheet to follow the steps of effective condom use.

b) Divide students into small groups and assign a peer leader to each group (one activity sheet needed per group).

2. Demonstrate how to use a condom with a student (peer leader) helping you by reading each step as you do it. (You will need one or two condoms and a model penis or a banana or a cucumber; alternatively students can practise on their fingers.) If time permits, change positions with the student and read the steps while the student (peer leader) demonstrates.

3. If the class is divided into small groups, ask the peer leaders to demonstrate condom use to their group and encourage all students to practise themselves. The peer leaders may have to have had prior instruction.

4. Discuss questions with students (under Teacher asks). Students may share what they have heard about experience with condoms.

Note:

1. Humour is important. A relaxed class atmosphere is important.

2. It is alright to make mistakes. It shows that students too can make mistakes while practising.

3. Having a student demonstrate is the best learning situation as peers will listen and follow their classmates more than they do their teachers.

4. You may need someone to hold the banana, cucumber or model penis (you need two hands).

What the peer leader(s) does

Peer leaders could help you:

· Demonstrate
· Read the steps in effective condom use
· Hold the model penis, banana or cucumber

5 No to unprotected sex (demonstration) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom

Purpose

Using the skills learned in Unit 2 on assertive behaviour, students learn to use an assertive message with a partner who doesn’t want to use a condom or doesn’t have one to use.

What the teacher does

1. Decide how to teach this activity:

a) Provide each student with an activity sheet and have them follow the script as the teacher reviews the steps and role-plays the situation.

b) Review the steps and role-play the situation with another student (only two activity sheets are needed).

2. Have a student (peer leader) read each step as you (or another student) read the script.

3. Do the role-play three times - first with a refuse ending, then a delay ending, and finally with a bargain ending. You may want to use different students for the second and third role-play.

4. Tell them that the next step is for the whole class to develop the three different endings.

What the peer leader(s) does

Peer leaders can help the teacher by:

· Playing a role in the situation with the teacher.
· Role-playing an ending with another student (peer leader).

6 No to unprotected sex (class participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom

Purpose

To provide the class with an opportunity to make an assertive response to a person who has negative attitudes towards condoms and is persuading a person to have sex without a condom.

What the teacher does

1. Decide how to teach this activity:

a) Provide each student with an activity sheet. The teacher will read or role-play the situation and students will suggest refuse, delay, and bargain responses. The students and teacher will decide on the best response and put it in the appropriate space.

b) The teacher will do the activity in a similar way as a) but the students will not have an activity sheet. Responses will be written on the blackboard and students will write the best response on a piece of paper (only one activity sheet is needed).

c) Students are placed in small groups and one activity sheet is provided for each group. The group makes suggestions on responses and the best response is recorded. A class activity follows in which the best response from the various groups is recorded on the blackboard (only one activity sheet per group is needed).

2. Suggestions for refuse, delay and bargain responses are obtained from the students and the best response is recorded.

3. When completed, role-play the total scene three times - using refusal the first time, delay the second and bargain the third time. The teacher and a student (peer leader) or two students (two peer leaders) can do the role-play. An example is shown below of a possible refuse, delay and bargain ending.

Refuse: You know I like you very much but I really don’t want to have sex without a condom.
Delay: I think it would be a good idea to wait until you feel less embarrassed about condoms.
Bargain: Maybe we could buy condoms together and I could help you use one.

What the peer leader(s) does

Peer leaders can:

· Be in charge of a small group.
· Role-play the situation.

7 No to unprotected sex (individual participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom

Purpose

To allow students to make their own assertive responses to someone who is trying to persuade them to have sex without a condom.

What the teacher does

1. Decide how to teach this activity.

a) Provide an activity sheet for each student and have them do the activity individually or in pairs.

b) Read the situation and response and have the students write their refuse, delay and bargain ending on a piece of paper (only one activity sheet needed).

c) Write the activity on the blackboard and have the students write their refuse, delay and bargain ending on a piece of paper (one activity sheet needed).

2. Ask the students to read out their suggestions for the three endings.

3. Ask for volunteers to read the entire script with a different ending each time. Examples of the three endings are provided below.

Refuse: Even though I’d like to have sex with you, I definitely won’t without a condom.
Delay: It can’t hurt to wait until we do have a condom. I’ll feel so much safer.
Bargain: Let’s just fool around this time and have sex when we do have a condom.

What the peer leader(s) does

Peer leaders can:

· Write the activity on the blackboard.
· Role-play the three endings.