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close this bookBetter Farming Series 06 - The Soil: How to Improve the Soil (FAO - INADES, 1976, 29 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPreface
close this folderPlan of work
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentManure (dung)
View the documentCompost
View the documentGreen manure
close this folderFertilizers
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderThe chief fertilizers
View the documentNitrogen fertilizers
View the documentPhosphorus fertilizers
View the documentPotassium fertilizers
View the documentHow to read a label
View the documentApplying fertilizers
close this folderHow to improve the soil for many years
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderIrrigation
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentHow to keep water for irrigation
View the documentHow to fetch water
View the documentHow to irrigate
View the documentDrainage
close this folderClearing the land and grubbing the trees
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentHow to clear land
View the documentHow to grub trees
View the documentFarming with animal power
View the documentSuggested question paper

Green manure

When you do not have enough manure or compost, you can enrich the soil all the same.
You do it by sowing plants.

When they have grown to a good size, cut them down, mix them with the soil by turning it over with a hoe or plough.

The plants rot and make the soil richer. These plants are called green manure.

For example, you can sow Pueraria, and plough it in when the seeds begin to form.
Green manures do not yield any harvest.

They are plants which are grown and then put into the soil. They enrich the soil with humus and make possible better harvests afterwards.

Manure, compost and green manure require no money.

They require only work.