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close this bookRelated Agroforestry Livelihood (IIRR, 1992, 30 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
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View the documentWorkshop to revise the agroforestry technology information kit (ATIK)
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View the documentSteering Committee
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View the documentCurrent program thrusts in upland development
close this folderMedicinal uses of upland vegetation (including plant essences)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentCollection/harvesting medicinal plants
View the documentPrimary processing of medicinal plants
View the documentGlossary of terms
close this folderBio-intensive gardening with agroforestry
View the documentProcedure
View the documentSucceeding planting seasons
View the documentMini-pond for water-limited areas
close this folderSmall water-impounding technologies
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View the documentStructures for diverting surface water for irrigation purposes
View the documentStructures for storing surface water, for watering and other similar uses
View the documentStructure for storing surface water, for drinking and domestic consumption purposes

Glossary of terms

Decoction -- The plant materials are boiled in water for 1520 minutes or until the water is reduced to half its original volume. Allow to cool, strain and drink as recommended.

Infusion -- Boiling water is poured over the plant material in a container, covered and allowed to stand for 15 minutes, strained and used immediately upon cooling. Brown sugar or honey may be added for pleasant taste.

In preparing medicinal plants, use containers made of inert materials, such as clay pots, enamel-lined, pyrex, etc., not metalic utensils.

Infusions and decoctions should be freshly-prepared; a day's dose may be prepared and kept fresh in a thermos bottle or in a refrigerator, if available.

Syrups -- The plant material is prepared as a decoction first and, after straining, honey or syrup made by boiling brown sugar in water (1:1) is added. Allow to simmer further until syrup is of the desired consistency. Syrups keep longer than decoctions and infusions.

Juices -- These are extracted from fresh plant parts, taken internally or applied locally on the affected parts of the body, as the case may be.

Poultice -- Soften, pound or crush fresh plant material. Mix with a little warm oil, apply externally and hold in place with a piece of clean cloth. Sometimes, mashed broiled rice or gawgaw is mixed with the plant material instead of oil This dressing should be changed daily.

Liniments - Plant material is crushed and macerated in basi or tuba, strained and used internally or externally.

Ointments - Juices extracted from plant material with the aid of a little basi, tuba or lambanog, then blended into a sufficient amount of Vaselina blanca or lard. This is for external application.