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close this bookSchool Health Education to Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) : Teachers' Guide (UNESCO - WHO, 1994, 117 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentIntroduction
View the document1. The programme
View the document2. Teaching methods
View the document3. The classroom atmosphere
View the document4. Peer leaders
View the document5. Participation of parents and family members
View the document6. Test items for student evaluation
View the document7. Questions on HIV/AIDS/STD
close this folderUnit 1. Basic knowledge on HIV/AIDS/STD
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 HIV/AIDS/STD basic questions and answers - What is HIV/AIDS/STD?
View the document2 Looking into AIDS - Fun test on HIV/AIDS/STD
View the document3 HIV/AIDS/STD - What do they mean? - Definitions of HIV/AIDS/STD
View the document4 How a person gets HIV - Information on transmission
View the document5 You can’t get AIDS by... - Ways HIV is not transmitted
View the document6 What do you believe? - Short test on transmission
View the document7 What would you do? - Case studies on transmission
View the document8 What is your risk? - Evaluating risk behaviours
View the document9 Are you at risk (part 1)
View the documentAre you at risk (part 2)
View the documentAre you at risk (part 3) - Evaluating risk behaviours and accumulated risks
View the document10 Protect yourself against AIDS - Information sheet on protection
View the document11 Dear Doctor Sue - Letters on protection
View the document12 Which is safer? - Evaluating ways of protection
View the document13 What happens with HIV infection? - Information on signs and symptoms
View the document14 How do you know if you have HIV/AIDS? - Case studies on signs and symptoms
View the document15 Testing for HIV - Basic information on testing
View the document16 Test: What you know about testing - Short test on testing for HIV
View the document17 AIDS help - Who? Where? - Where help can be found
View the document18 You be the doctor - Case studies on drug use
View the document19 Are you a responsible person? - Behavioural intent questions on personal responsibility
close this folderUnit 2. Responsible behaviour: delaying sex
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 Reasons to say NO - Reasons for delaying sex
View the document2 To delay or not to delay (a, b) - Case Study - Reasons for and against sex
View the document3 “Lines” and more “lines” - Pressure to have sex
View the document4 Guidelines: help to delay sex - Help for delaying sex
View the document5 What to do? - Case studies on sex for delaying sex
View the document6 Affection without sex? - Alternatives to sexual intercourse
View the document7 What’s next? - Ranking physical activities
View the document8 Am I assertive? - Definition of passive, aggressive, and assertive behaviours
View the document9 Who’s assertive? - Case studies - types of behaviours
View the document10 Assertive messages - Four steps to assertive behaviour
View the document11 Your assertive message (class) - Four steps to assertive behaviour
View the document12 Your assertive message (individual) - Four steps to assertive behaviour
View the document13 Responding to persuasion (demonstration) - How to refuse, delay, bargain
View the document14 Responding to persuasion (class activity) - How to refuse, delay, bargain
View the document15 Responding to persuasion (individual) - How to refuse, delay, bargain
View the document16 You decide - Activity on gender differences
View the document17 Dealing with threats and violence - Case study on violence in dating
View the document18 Being assertive every day - Take-home activity on being assertive
close this folderUnit 3. Responsible behaviour: protected sex
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 The condom - Information about the condom
View the document2 Arguments people use against using condoms - How to deal with a partner who is negative about condom use
View the document3 How to use a condom - Humorous explanation about condom use
View the documentCondom practice - Students practice putting a condom on a model
View the document5 No to unprotected sex (demonstration) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document6 No to unprotected sex (class participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document7 No to unprotected sex (individual participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
close this folderUnit 4. Care and support
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 Who discriminates? - Definition and case studies
View the document2 The story of two communities - Two communities react differently to someone with AIDS
View the document3 Why compassion? - Explores reasons for compassion
View the document4 What could you do? - Compassion for two people with AIDS
View the document5 How to’s of care giving - Information on how to care for someone with AIDS
View the document6 How to keep yourself safe - Precautionary care for someone who is looking after someone with AIDS
View the document7 What do you know? - Two tests to determine what students know about caregiving
View the document8 Support for responsible behaviour - How to show support for someone who has made healthy decisions
View the document9 Compassion, tolerance and support - Showing support outside the classroom

4. Peer leaders


Figure

[write this section according to the role given to peer leaders in the programme]

Why peer leaders

Young people listen more attentively and accept messages from respected peers more readily than from a teacher. This is especially true in areas of health, safety and sexuality. Some students are influential in that they set the group norms and function as models for the group. They can become peer leaders. Peer leaders provide assistance to the teacher which allows him/her to spend more time on preparation, individual attention to students and classroom management.

Who is a peer leader

A peer leader is a person who helps the teacher in many ways:

· Helps in classroom management, e.g. handing out activity sheets, etc.
· Helps in demonstrations, e.g. using a condom
· Helps in role-plays, e.g. being assertive
· Leads a class team, e.g. during a quiz
· Reads stories, questions, answers to activities
· Volunteers answers to activities
· Leads a small group
· Reports findings of small groups
· Models appropriate behaviour, e.g. is assertive
· Carries out certain activities and reports back, e.g. buying a condom
· Takes polls, e.g. when teacher wants to know how many answered “yes”.
· Draws diagrams on the blackboard.

Selection of peer leader(s)

Peer leaders may be selected by their own peers. Otherwise, select from the class individuals who are:

· Considered as opinion-leaders by the other students.
· Concerned about the welfare of their peers.
· Able to listen to others.
· Self-confident.
· Dependable, honest.
· Well-liked by other students
· Well-rounded students - not necessarily the best students academically.
· Not all male or all female (if possible).
· Perhaps older students.
· Perhaps sexually active (if this information is available).

In this guide, ways to use peer leaders are not explained for every activity. However, peer leaders may be used whenever the teacher feels this would be useful and appropriate.

This is a very sensitive process as it is critical that selected students not be rejected by other classmates as being the teacher’s “pet” - both for the sake of the programme and the self-esteem of the peer leaders, [provide here detailed guidance on peer leader training, illustrate those activities where peer leaders are involved, suggest forms of recognition of their role]