Cover Image
close this bookSchool Health Education to Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) : Teachers' Guide (UNESCO - WHO, 1994, 117 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentIntroduction
View the document1. The programme
View the document2. Teaching methods
View the document3. The classroom atmosphere
View the document4. Peer leaders
View the document5. Participation of parents and family members
View the document6. Test items for student evaluation
View the document7. Questions on HIV/AIDS/STD
close this folderUnit 1. Basic knowledge on HIV/AIDS/STD
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 HIV/AIDS/STD basic questions and answers - What is HIV/AIDS/STD?
View the document2 Looking into AIDS - Fun test on HIV/AIDS/STD
View the document3 HIV/AIDS/STD - What do they mean? - Definitions of HIV/AIDS/STD
View the document4 How a person gets HIV - Information on transmission
View the document5 You can’t get AIDS by... - Ways HIV is not transmitted
View the document6 What do you believe? - Short test on transmission
View the document7 What would you do? - Case studies on transmission
View the document8 What is your risk? - Evaluating risk behaviours
View the document9 Are you at risk (part 1)
View the documentAre you at risk (part 2)
View the documentAre you at risk (part 3) - Evaluating risk behaviours and accumulated risks
View the document10 Protect yourself against AIDS - Information sheet on protection
View the document11 Dear Doctor Sue - Letters on protection
View the document12 Which is safer? - Evaluating ways of protection
View the document13 What happens with HIV infection? - Information on signs and symptoms
View the document14 How do you know if you have HIV/AIDS? - Case studies on signs and symptoms
View the document15 Testing for HIV - Basic information on testing
View the document16 Test: What you know about testing - Short test on testing for HIV
View the document17 AIDS help - Who? Where? - Where help can be found
View the document18 You be the doctor - Case studies on drug use
View the document19 Are you a responsible person? - Behavioural intent questions on personal responsibility
close this folderUnit 2. Responsible behaviour: delaying sex
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 Reasons to say NO - Reasons for delaying sex
View the document2 To delay or not to delay (a, b) - Case Study - Reasons for and against sex
View the document3 “Lines” and more “lines” - Pressure to have sex
View the document4 Guidelines: help to delay sex - Help for delaying sex
View the document5 What to do? - Case studies on sex for delaying sex
View the document6 Affection without sex? - Alternatives to sexual intercourse
View the document7 What’s next? - Ranking physical activities
View the document8 Am I assertive? - Definition of passive, aggressive, and assertive behaviours
View the document9 Who’s assertive? - Case studies - types of behaviours
View the document10 Assertive messages - Four steps to assertive behaviour
View the document11 Your assertive message (class) - Four steps to assertive behaviour
View the document12 Your assertive message (individual) - Four steps to assertive behaviour
View the document13 Responding to persuasion (demonstration) - How to refuse, delay, bargain
View the document14 Responding to persuasion (class activity) - How to refuse, delay, bargain
View the document15 Responding to persuasion (individual) - How to refuse, delay, bargain
View the document16 You decide - Activity on gender differences
View the document17 Dealing with threats and violence - Case study on violence in dating
View the document18 Being assertive every day - Take-home activity on being assertive
close this folderUnit 3. Responsible behaviour: protected sex
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 The condom - Information about the condom
View the document2 Arguments people use against using condoms - How to deal with a partner who is negative about condom use
View the document3 How to use a condom - Humorous explanation about condom use
View the documentCondom practice - Students practice putting a condom on a model
View the document5 No to unprotected sex (demonstration) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document6 No to unprotected sex (class participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
View the document7 No to unprotected sex (individual participation) - How to be assertive with someone who doesn’t want to use a condom
close this folderUnit 4. Care and support
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1 Who discriminates? - Definition and case studies
View the document2 The story of two communities - Two communities react differently to someone with AIDS
View the document3 Why compassion? - Explores reasons for compassion
View the document4 What could you do? - Compassion for two people with AIDS
View the document5 How to’s of care giving - Information on how to care for someone with AIDS
View the document6 How to keep yourself safe - Precautionary care for someone who is looking after someone with AIDS
View the document7 What do you know? - Two tests to determine what students know about caregiving
View the document8 Support for responsible behaviour - How to show support for someone who has made healthy decisions
View the document9 Compassion, tolerance and support - Showing support outside the classroom

Acknowledgments

The World Health Organization and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization gratefully acknowledge the valuable contributions of:

· Alan Robertson:

Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada (text)

· Claudius Ceccon:

CECIP - Popular Image Creation Center, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (art direction and illustrations)

· UNICEF Zimbabwe:

For permission to reproduce sections of the publication Methods in AIDS Education, Ministry of Education and Culture of Zimbabwe and UNICEF, Harare, 1993

as well as the contribution of the numerous professionals who reviewed the drafts:

· M. Palmaan, N. Ford, N. Nturibi, A. Mehryar

· B. Dick, R. Foul-Doyle, C. Wang (UNICEF)

· At the India workshop:

A.B. Dandekar, Sudha V. Rao, P.K. Durani, D.K. Mukhopadhyay, D.G. Krishna, V. Reghu, J. Kaur, G.C. Singh, R.S. Lal, B.P. Sinha, L. Ibungohal Singh, S. Sapru, Usha Pillai, Anu Gupta, D.S. Muley, D. Lahiri, J. Mitra, Dinesh Sharma, S.B. Yadav, K.K. Sadhu, J.L. Pandey, S.A. Gopal

· At the Namibia workshop:

M. Shaketange, B. Saunders, M. Plaatjes, E.O Meara, J. Kloppers, J. Boois, P. Hailonga, M. B. Mhopjeni, E. Kiangi, M. Maree, P. Verhoef, C. Oliver, C. Mwaala, V. Orinda (UNICEF), J. Viteli, B. Valashiya

· At the Barbados workshop:

Y. Balgobin, H. Bend, J. Crichlow, G. Cumberbatch, M. Deane, G. Drakes, D. Gill, I. Denny, H. Gittens, M. Grant, A. Griffith, Y. Holder, E. Best, R. Marville, G. McBean (UNICEF), S. Millington, T. Payn, F. Browne, V. Roach, S. Clarke.

The following publications have served as primary sources for this package:

School Health Education to Prevent AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, WHO/UNESCO, WHO AIDS Series No. 10, World Health Organization, Geneva, 1992.

Comprehensive School Health Education - Suggested Guidelines for Action, UNESCO/WHO/UNICEF, World Health Organization, Geneva, 1992.

The graphic work for this Resource Package was done by CECIP, an NGO dedicated to the creation of educational materials. We gratefully acknowledge the advice of Dr. Evelyn Eisenstein, pediatrician, member of the International Association of Adolescent Health and coordinator of CECIP’s Health Working Group, and of Dr. Bernardo Galvde Castro, coordinator of the Institutional AIDS Program of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Salvador, Bahia and a member of CECIP’s Association. Desktop publishing by Cristiana Lacerda.

CECIP
Largo de SFrancisco de Paula, 34/4° andar
CEP 20051-070 Rio de Janeiro - RJ - Brasil
Fax: (55 21) 224 4565 e 224 3812

This document is part of a package that includes:

· Handbook for Curriculum Planners
· Students’ Activities
· Teachers’ Guide