Cover Image
close this bookNew Training Technologies (ILO - UNEVOC, 1995, 95 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentChapter 1 New Technologies and Training
close this folderChapter 2 Delivery mechanisms and available NTTs
View the document(introduction...)
close this folderDelivery mechanisms
View the document1. Group learning
View the document2. Individual learning
close this folderAvailable NTTs
View the document1. NTTs and group learning
View the document2. NTTs and individual learning
View the documentSoft technologies
close this folderChapter 3 Selecting the appropriate NTTs
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPolitical or strategic decision
View the documentThe teaching/learning environment analysis
close this folderCost/benefit analysis
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1. Courseware analysis and development
View the document2. Course distribution
View the document3. Delivery costs
View the document4. Update costs
View the document5. Intangible costs and benefits
View the document6. A simplified cost model
close this folderChapter 4 Implementing NTTs in a training environment
View the document(introduction...)
View the document1. Demonstrations
View the document2. Order and install equipment
View the document3. Hands-on workshops
View the document4. Train the trainers and developers
View the document5. Prototypes
View the document6. Develop titles
View the document7. Organize help, support
View the documentChapter 5 Trends in NTTs
View the documentConclusion
close this folderAppendix A Compatibility
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPC buses (architecture)
View the documentMicroprocessors
View the documentOperating systems
View the documentGraphic modes
View the documentDigital images, sound and video files
View the documentColour standards
View the documentVideotape formats
View the documentAppendix B Suggested PC configurations
View the documentAppendix C Laser technology
View the documentAppendix D Digital versus analogue
View the documentAppendix E Digitizing
View the documentAppendix F Telecommunications and training
View the documentAppendix G More technologies for training
View the documentAppendix H Training the disabled
View the documentGlossary23

Graphic modes

The graphics adapter that equips a PC determines the quality of text and images one can show on the display screen:

· the CGA (Colour Graphics Adapter) adapter is cheap and offers a rather poor quality; 320x200 pixels and four colours, or 640x200 pixels in black and white; WINDOWS does not support this type of graphics adapter;

· the MCGA (Multi Colour Graphics Adapter) adapter is offered by IBM with 320x200 pixels and 256 colours out of 256,000; or 640x480 pixels and two colours (black and white);

· the EGA (Enhanced Graphics Adapter) adapter offers 640x350 pixels with 16 colours out of 64;

· the VGA (Video Graphics Array) adapter is offered by IBM with 640x480 pixels with 16 colours out of 256,000 (262,144), or 64 grey shades on a mono display;

· the VGA8 adapter is offered by IBM with 360x480 pixels and 256 colours out of 256,000; it works on VGA display screens;

· the 8514/A adapter if offered by IBM with 640x480 and 256 colours, or 1024x768 and 256 colours when the application supports it;

· the XGA (Extended Graphics Adapter) adapter is offered by IBM with 1024x768 pixels and 256 colours out of 256,000;

· the SVGA (Super VGA) adapter is offered by all other manufacturers and works with 1024x768 pixels, with 256 colours.

Quality images recorded with a certain resolution can be converted by certain software into a lower resolution; the reverse is unfortunately not possible. Compatibility always exists downwards: a SVGA screen may show a VGA image, but the reverse is not possible.