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close this bookScience and Technology in the Transformation of the World (UNU, 1982, 496 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForeword
close this folderOpening addresses
View the documentZivorad Kovacevic
View the documentPavle Savic
View the documentMiroslav Pecujlic
View the documentKinhide Mushakoji
close this folderThe gear-box of priorities
View the documentAnouar Abdel-Malek
close this folderLe nécessaire et le possible dans la formation du mondial (Keynote Address)
close this folderHenri Lefebvre
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPremière Partie: Le Mondial, Esquisse d'une Analyse
View the documentDeuxième Partie: L'Informationnel et sa Problématique a l'Echelle Mondiale
View the documentConclusion
close this folderSession I: Science and technology as formative factors of contemporary civilization - from domination to liberation
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentReport on session I
close this folderTechnology and society
View the documentRalko Tomovic
View the documentConclusion
close this folderParadigmes scientifiques et auto-détermination humaine
View the documentYves Barel
close this folderScience and the making of contemporary civilization
close this folderJ. Leite Lopes
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentI. The physical image of the world
View the documentII. Science and underdevelopment in Latin America
View the documentIII. Science and dependent development
View the documentIV. Endogenization of science in which society?
View the documentV. The aims of science
View the documentVI. Science for liberation
View the documentNotes
close this folderSession II: Technology generation and transfer - Transformation alternatives
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentReport on session II
close this folderThe collective self-reliance of developing countries in the fields of science and technology
close this folderSlobodan Ristic
View the documentI. General considerations
View the documentII. Co-operation among developing countries in developing national potentials
View the documentIll. The strengthening of the negotiating position of developing countries in science and technology
View the documentIV. Instead of a conclusion
View the documentNotes
close this folderScience and technology in Japanese history: university and society
close this folderKonji Kawano
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentI. Japan before the second world war
View the documentII. The change after the second world war
View the documentIII. The significance of ''the age of local communities''
close this folderLegal aspects of the transfer of technology in modern society
close this folderVestry Besarovic
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentThe relevance of the legal order to the transfer of technological knowledge
View the documentSome proposed measures on the national and international levels
close this folderPhilosophy (concepts) of scientific and technological development
close this folderVladimir Slambuk
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentI. Development and underdevelopment
View the documentII. Definition of some basic terms
View the documentIII. Existing philosophies of scientific-technological development
View the documentIV. Self-reliance
View the documentBibliography
close this folderSession III: Biology, medicine, and the future of mankind
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentReport on session III
close this folderLa maîtrise de la vie: Pour quoi faire?
close this folderBruno Ribes
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentI. Necessite et enjeux
View the documentII. La 'logique' du vivant
View the documentIII. Quoi faire?
close this folderRestructuring a framework for assessment of science and technology as a driving power for social development: a biosociological approach
close this folderYuji Mori
View the documentI. Introduction - The darwinian and ned-darwinian systems
View the documentII. Sociobiology or biosociology? how to view humans and their society
View the documentIII. Three levels of production and consumption
View the documentIV. Needs
View the documentV. Science and technology as cultural phenomena
View the documentVI. The turning point of social development: space and time
View the documentNotes
close this folderHuman aspects of medical sciences: Medical technology and the responsibility of the physician
View the documentLjubisa Rakic
close this folderSession IV: The control of space and power
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentReport on session IV
close this folderToward a clearer definition of the role of science and technology in transformation
close this folderOsama A. El-Kholy
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentI. A view of the problem from within
View the documentII. The view from without
View the documentIII. Toward a clearer definition of the role of science and technology in transformation
View the documentAppendix I.
View the documentAppendix II.
View the documentAppendix III.
View the documentNotes
close this folderScience, technology, and politics in a changing world
close this folderJosé A. Silva Michelena
View the documentI. What kind of transformation?
View the documentII. The nature of the crisis
View the documentIII. World political trends
View the documentIV. The role of science and technology
View the documentV. A proposition
View the documentNotes
close this folderThe technology of repression and repressive technology: The social bearers and cultural consequences
close this folderZoran Vidakovic
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentI. The vicious circle of repressive technology
View the documentII. The main social figures of repressive technology
View the documentIII. Militarization of the economy and science: the birthplace of the metropolitan technocracy
View the documentIV. The genesis of the ''technocratic elite'' in dependent societies
close this folderNuclear energy in Latin America: The Brazilian case
close this folderLuiz Pinguelli Rosa
View the documentI. The Brazilian nuclear programme and the treaty with the federal Republic of Germany
View the documentII. Perspectives on nuclear energy in Brazil
View the documentIII. Nuclear energy and the prestige of national power
View the documentIV. The possibility of latin american nuclear co-operation
View the documentV. The position of brazil regarding nuclear proliferation
View the documentAppendices
View the documentReferences
close this folderSession V: From intellectual dependence to creativity
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentIntroduction
close this folderReport on session V
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentDiscussion
View the documentSummary
close this folderLa apropiación y la recuperación de las ciencias sociales en el contexto de los proyectos culturales endógenos
close this folderGuillermo Bonfil Batalla
View the documentIntroducción
View the documentI. El problema de la creatividad endógena en ciencias sociales.
View the documentUntitled
View the documentIII. La formación de una intelectualidad India contemporánea.
View the documentIV. Notas para un proyecto de desarrollo endógeno de las ciencias sociales.
View the documentNotas
close this folderOn the edge of a razor blade: the new historical blocs and socio-cultural alternatives in Europe
close this folderMiroslav Pecuilic and Zoran Vidakovic
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentI. The new janus - Two faces of science and technology
View the documentII. The pathology of power and science
View the documentIII. The new protagonist - social movements and organic intelligentsia
View the documentIV. Dramatic birth of alternatives
View the documentV. Self-reliance and solidarity (autonomy and new universality)
View the documentNotes
close this folderScience and technology in the history of modern Japan: imitation or endogenous creativity?
close this folderTetsuro Nakaoka
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentNotes
close this folderScience and technology as an organic part of contemporary culture
View the documentZvonimir Damjanovic
close this folderJoseph Needham's contribution to the history of science and technology in China
close this folderGregory Blue
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentNotes
View the documentReferences
View the documentGeneral report on the seminar
View the documentAppendix: Position papers
View the documentParticipants
View the documentFrom the charter of the United Nations University

From the charter of the United Nations University

ARTICLE I

Purpose and structure

1. The United Nations University shall be an international community of scholars. engaged in research, post-graduate training and dissemination of knowledge in furtherance of the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations. In achieving its stated objectives, it shall function under the joint sponsorship of the United Nations and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (hereinafter referred to as UNESCO}. through a central programming and coordinating body and a network of research and post-graduate training centres and programmes located in the developed and developing countries.

2. The University shall devote its work to research into the pressing global problems of human survival, development and welfare that are the concern of the United Nations and its agencies, with due attention to the social sciences and the humanities as well as natural sciences, pure and applied.

3. The research programmes of the institutions of the University shall include, among other subjects, coexistence between peoples having different cultures, languages and social systems; peaceful relations between States and the maintenance of peace and security; human rights; economic and social change and development; the environment and the proper use of resources; basic scientific research and the application of the results of science and technology in the interests of development; and universal human values related to the improvement of the quality of life.

4. The University shall disseminate the knowledge gained in its activities to the United Nations and its agencies, to scholars and to the public, in order to increase dynamic interaction in the world-wide community of learning and research.

5. The University and all those who work in it shall act in accordance with the spirit of the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations and the Constitution of UNESCO and with the fundamental principles of contemporary international law.

6. The University shall have as a central objective of its research and training centres and programmes the continuing growth of vigorous academic and scientific communities everywhere and particularly in the developing countries, devoted to their vital needs in the fields of learning and research within the framework of the aims assigned to those centres and programmes in the present Charter. It shall endeavour to alleviate the intellectual isolation of persons in such communities in the developing countries which might otherwise become a reason for their moving to developed countries.

7. In its post-graduate training the University shall assist scholars, especially young scholars, to participate in research in order to increase their capability to contribute to the extension, application and diffusion of knowledge. The University may also undertake the training of persons who will serve in international or national technical assistance programmes, particularly in regard to an interdisciplinary approach to the problems with which they will be called upon to deal.

ARTICLE II

Academic freedom and autonomy

1. The University shall enjoy autonomy within the framework of the United Nations. It shall also enjoy the academic freedom required for the achievement of its objectives, with particular reference to the choice of subjects and methods of research and training, the selection of persons and institutions to share in its tasks, and freedom of expression. The University shall decide freely on the use of the financial resources allocated for the execution of its functions.