Cover Image
close this bookBetter Farming Series 19 - Market Gardening (FAO - INADES, 1977, 56 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPreface
View the documentMarket gardening
View the documentChoosing the site
View the documentWhat tools to use
close this folderClearing the plot
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentTilling
View the documentPreparing the beds
close this folderSowing
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentSowing in open beds or nursery beds
View the documentSowing in rows or seed holes
View the documentTransplanting
close this folderTaking care of the vegetable crop
View the documentWatering
View the documentWeeding and earthing up
View the documentMulching
View the documentTying
View the documentPutting up shelters
View the documentThinning
View the documentStaking
View the documentPruning
close this folderImproving soil fertility
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentThe advantages of rotation
View the documentApplying manure and fertilizers
View the documentHow to make compost
View the documentThe main fertilizers
close this folderControl of insects and diseases
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentDisinfecting the soil
View the documentHarvest and sale
close this folderSalad plants
View the documentSalad plants are leaf vegetables
View the documentHow to grow salad plants
View the documentHarvesting
close this folderTomatoes
View the documentHow to grow tomatoes
View the documentTomatoes must be well tended
View the documentGuard against snails, insects and diseases
View the documentHarvesting
close this folderBeans
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPrepare the soil well
View the documentSowing
View the documentBeans must be well tended
View the documentProtect against insects and diseases
View the documentHarvesting
close this folderOnions
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPrepare the soil well
View the documentSow in nursery beds and transplant
View the documentProtect against insects and diseases
View the documentHarvesting
View the documentSuggested question paper

Sow in nursery beds and transplant

78. Some market gardeners have large onion fields. To sow in nursery beds and to transplant later means a lot of work. These market gardeners do better to sow their onions in open beds.

Many market gardeners have small onion fields. For these people it is better to sow the onions in nursery beds and to transplant them.

Do not sow seeds which are more than one year old.

Sowing in open beds

79. Leave 25 to 30 centimetres between rows and, along the rows, 6 to 8 centimetres between plants. You will need 4 kilogrammes of seed for 1 hectare.

Sowing in nursery beds and transplanting

80. Disinfect the soil of the nursery beds. The soil should have a fine filth and be firm in depth. Leave 10 to 15 centimetres between rows.

Make a shelter and water the beds twice a day. Thin out surplus seedlings and weed.

When the seedlings have grown to a height of 15 to 20 centimetres, take them out of the nursery beds and transplant them into new beds. Leave 20 to 30 centimetres between rows and, along the rows, 10 to 15 centimetres between plants. Set the plants only 2 or 3 centimetres deep In the soil.

Pack the earth down well around each plant. Water. If any plants do not grow, replace them with seedlings you have kept in the nursery beds.

Do not earth up the onion plants when you cultivate; if you cover the bulb with earth, the bulb does not grow well.