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close this bookLife Skills for Young Ugandans- Secondary Teachers' Training Manual (UNICEF, 254 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForeword
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgements
close this folderSection One: The Life Skills Education Initiative
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View the document1.0 Background
close this folder2.0 What are Life Skills?
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View the document2.1 WHAT ARE THE AIMS OF LIFE SKILLS EDUCATION?
View the document2.2 WHY A SKILLS BASED APPROACH?
View the document2.3 WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF LIFE SKILLS EDUCATION?
close this folder3.0 Life Skills and the Secondary School Child
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View the document3.1 HOW CAN LIFE SKILLS EDUCATION BE PROMOTED?
View the document3.2 WHEN CAN LIFE SKILLS BE PROMOTED?
View the document3.3 WHERE CAN LIFE SKILLS BE PROMOTED?
View the document3.4 WHO SHOULD RECEIVE LIFE SKILLS EDUCATION?
close this folder4.0 Other Supporting Activities/Strategies
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View the document4.1 CHILDREN’S RIGHTS
View the document4.2 THE SARA COMMUNICATION INITIATIVE (SCI)
close this folder5.0 Problems and Solutions
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View the document5.1 YES... BUT...
close this folderSection Two: Methodologies and Training Session Activities
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close this folderPART A. General Activities
close this folder1.0 Introductory and Preparatory Activities
View the document1.1 ICE-BREAKING
View the document1.2 EXPECTATIONS AND FEARS
View the document1.3 LAYING GROUND RULES FOR LIFE SKILLS EDUCATION
View the document1.4 TEAM BUILDING
View the document1.5 COPING WITH DIFFICULT GROUP MEMBERS (BEHAVIOURS)
View the document1.6 ENERGISERS
close this folder2.0 Participatory Methods
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View the document2.1 BRAINSTORMING
View the document2.2 QUESTIONNAIRES
View the document2.3 RANKING
View the document2.4 CASE STUDIES
View the document2.5 ROLE PLAYS
View the document2.6 DRAWING
View the document2.7 DISCUSSION
View the document2.8 BUZZ GROUPS
View the document2.9 TABLEAUX
View the document2.10 STORYTELLING
View the document2.11 PROCESSING
View the document2.12 UTILISING THE CREATIVE ABILITIES OF THE PARTICIPANTS OR THE STUDENTS
close this folderPART B. Specific activities that may be used to focus upon some of the key issues of Life Skills Education
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View the documentWORKSHOP A: HOW TO IDENTIFY THE NEEDS OF A 13 YEAR OLD UGANDAN CHILD
View the documentWORKSHOP B: WHAT ARE THE PRIORITIES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN?
View the documentWORKSHOP C: INTRODUCING LIFE SKILLS CONCEPTS
View the documentWORKSHOP D: ATTITUDES TO LIFE SKILLS
View the documentWORKSHOP E: AIMS OF LIFESKILLS EDUCATION
View the documentWORKSHOP F: THE HEALTH PROMOTING SCHOOL
View the documentWORKSHOP G: PROMOTING SELF ESTEEM IN SCHOOL
close this folderSection Three: A Framework for Developing Life Skills within the Secondary Health Education Syllabus
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentSUMMARY - TOPICS AND LIFE SKILLS
View the documentA FRAMEWORK FOR DEVELOPING LIFE SKILLS WITHIN THE SECONDARY HEALTH EDUCATION SYLLABUS
close this folderSection Four: Sample Activities
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View the documentHEALTH
View the documentWATER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION
View the documentFAMILY HEALTH AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS
View the documentCOMMUNICABLE DISEASES
View the documentORAL HEALTH
View the documentSMOKING
View the documentDRUG ABUSE
close this folderSection Five: Preparing Your own Units
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View the document5.1 INTRODUCTION
View the document5.2 WHAT DOES IT TAKE?
View the document5.3 HOW TO PREPARE AN ACTIVITY
View the document5.4 SAMPLE LESSON PLANS FOR SECONDARY
View the document5.5 SUMMARY
View the documentReferences

DRUG ABUSE

Drug abuse is a growing problem in Ugandan society. Because it is known to be illegal, the full extent of the problem is not really known but children, both in and out of school, are being tempted to experiment with drugs, at the very age when they are prone to adventure. It is therefore very important to bring these issues into the open and prepare the youth to confront such temptations.


Figure

ACTIVITY

ARAALI’S CHOICE

Objectives

By the end of this session, students should be able to:

1. Explain the 3C’s method to good decision making.
2. Make good decisions concerning drugs.

Time: 40 minutes

Materials

Chart, pen, pencil, markers, exercise books.

Procedure

1. Write the three C’s to Good Decision Making on a large sheet of paper or the chalkboard and tell students to copy them down.

2. Give the case study of Araali’s Choice to the students and ask them to fill in the 3 Cs with reference to Araali and make a decision for him.

ARAALI’S CHOICE

Araali is a student at Kawaalya Secondary School. He is a very good footballer and is very popular in his class. Then his rival for popularity introduces marijuana into the class and convinces several of Araali’s best friends to start smoking it. It becomes the fashion in the class and those who have started smoking it laugh at the others for being so childish. Araali’s girlfriend has even smoked it twice and is putting strong pressure on Araali to give it a try. What should Araali do?

3. After each student has filled in the 3 Cs and made their decision for Araali, divide the class into groups to discuss their answers.

4. Groups report back to plenary for final discussion.

5. Conclude the activity with the discussion points below:

(i) What do you think of this model? Do you think it can help people make decisions?

(ii) How can you explore all the possible consequences of a choice before making a decision?

(iii) Which are more likely to help you make a good decision, your feelings or your thoughts?

(iv) How do you prioritise your choices?

(v) In what situations do you think this model might be useful to you? Why?

Learning Points

· Three C’s To Good Decision Making.

(i)

Challenge (or decision) you are facing.......................


Figure




(ii)

Choices you have.....................................................


Figure


Choice 1..................................................................



Choice 2..................................................................



Choice 3............................................................................





(iii)

Consequence(s) of each choice


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Positive

Negative



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..........................



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..........................



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..........................





(iv)

Your decision is........................................................


Hints

· Give enough time to all the students to come up with their choices and consequences. Do not hurry them otherwise the discussion will not take place properly.

· Other situations may concern whether to remain in school, love relationships, smoking etc. as well as issues of drug use and abuse.

Extension Activity

1. Ask students to produce similar scenarios where young people are faced by different choices. These can be used by the lecturer in later classes.