Cover Image
close this bookNutrition Guidelines (MSF, 1995, 191 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPreface
close this folderPart I: Nutrition Strategies in Emergency Situations
View the document1. Food crises
View the document2. Assessment of the nutritional situation
View the document3. Interventions: ensuring adequate general food availability and accessibility
View the document4. Interventions: selective feeding programmes
View the document5. Evaluation
close this folderPart II: Rapid Nutrition Surveys
View the document1. Introduction to anthropometric surveys
View the document2. Anthropometric measurements and indices
View the document3. Sampling methods
View the document4. Analysis, interpretation and recommendations
View the document5. Conclusions
close this folderPart III Selective feeding programmes
View the document1. Justification for selective programmes
View the document2. Criteria for admission and discharge to selective feeding programmes
View the document3. Screening and selection
View the document4.Treatment in a therapeutic feeding centre
View the document5. Treatment in supplementary feeding programmes
View the document6. Implementation and management of a feeding centre
View the document7. Registration and monitoring
View the document8. Evaluation of feeding programmes
View the document9. Food management
close this folderAnnexes
View the documentAnnex 1: Rapid assessment of the state of health of displaced populations or refugees (A.Moren - Medical News, No. 1)
View the documentAnnex 2: Mid - Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC)
View the documentAnnex 3: Nutritional status assessment in adults and adolescents
View the documentAnnex 4: Agencies involved in food relief
View the documentAnnex 5: Food composition table
View the documentAnnex 6: GENERAL RATION: How to calculate the energetic value
View the documentAnnex 7: Micronutrient deficiencies
View the documentAnnex 8: Food basket monitoring methodology
View the documentAnnex 9: Analyzing nutritional survey data
View the documentAnnex 10: Drawing of a random number
View the documentAnnex 11: Standardization of anthropometric measuring techniques
View the documentAnnex 12: Data collection forms
View the documentAnnex 13: W/H Reference tables
View the documentAnnex 14: Selection of food items for selective feeding programmes
View the documentAnnex 15: Oral rehydration for severely malnourished children
View the documentAnnex 16a: Preparation of High Energy Milk
View the documentAnnex 16b: Recipes for porridge for use in therapeutic and wet supplementary feeding programmes
View the documentAnnex 16c: Recipes for premix for dry ration supplementary feeding programmes
View the documentAnnex 17a:Example of a Therapeutic feeding centre
View the documentAnnex 17b: example of layouth of a <<wet>> supplementary feeding centre
View the documentAnnex 17c: Example of a DRY SFP
View the documentAnnex 18a: Example of an Attendance register (tfp or SFP)
View the documentAnnex 18b: Example of a Nutritional Status Monitoring (SFP)
View the documentAnnex 19a: TFP individual monitoring card
View the documentAnnex 19b: SFP individual monitoring card
View the documentAnnex 19c: Individual card for Supplementary feeding centre
View the documentAnnex 19d: Example of an individual card for dry blanket SFC
View the documentAnnex 20: Feeding programme indicator graphs
View the documentAnnex 22: MSF nutrition kits
View the documentBibliography

5. Conclusions

· Among displaced populations or refugees, evaluation of the nutritional status is essential in planning a relief programme. The measure of the prevalence of malnutrition, through a quick cross-sectional anthropometric survey gives valuable information when making decisions. The results of such a survey often have vital consequences for the community. That is the reason why these results must be reliable.

· The reliability of the results is related to compliance with the protocol. Each step is essential.

· The objectives should be clearly defined from the start, as should the plan of analysis.

· The sample should be representative of the population from which it was drawn. Systematic sampling when possible gives the same precision with half the sample size required for cluster sampling.

· Measures should be reliable. Training of data collectors and assessment of their performance through standardization tests is a corner stone of the survey.

· The report should include a summary mentioning the main findings and the recommendations made. Confidence intervals should be indicated whenever a proportion is given.

· The realization of a survey in the field is an excellent occasion for health workers to appreciate the living conditions of the population. On top of the actual proportion of malnourished children given by the survey, valuable additional information maybe observed. This additional information will be of great help in appreciating a situation.