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close this bookMedicinal Plants: Rescuing a Global Heritage (WB, 1997, 80 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentForeword
View the documentAbstract
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentExecutive summary
close this folder1. The global background
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View the documentEconomic issues
View the documentPolicy issues
View the documentRegulatory issues
View the documentSocial issues
View the documentConservation Issues
View the documentAgricultural issues
View the documentForestry issues
View the documentVeterinary issues
View the documentThe international research base
close this folder2. China
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View the documentProduction and trade
View the documentNotable Chinese medicinal plants
View the documentGovernment initiatives
View the documentLinks to modern medicine
View the documentLinks to agriculture
View the documentLinks to forestry
View the documentProtecting medicinal-plant biodiversity
close this folder3. India
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentProduction and trade
View the documentNotable Indian medicinal plants
View the documentGovernment initiatives
View the documentLinks to modern medicine
View the documentLinks to agriculture
View the documentLinks to forestry
View the documentLinks to veterinary medicine
View the documentProtecting medicinal-plant biodiversity
close this folder4. Conclusions
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View the documentChina and India
View the documentSocioeconomic impacts
View the documentTraditional knowledge
View the documentInformation transfer
View the documentPolicy and regulatory considerations
View the documentEconomic considerations
View the documentConservation considerations
View the documentResearch and development
View the documentCultivation
View the document5. Bibliography
View the documentRecent World Bank technical papers
View the documentDistributors of World Bank Publications

Abstract

Traditionally, medicinal plants have been considered solely part of the health sector, but increasingly they are part of agriculture and even of environmental programs. This is because demand for medicinal plants is increasing at such a rate that the stocks in the wild are being destroyed. Hundreds of species are overharvested and face extinction if they are not protected or cultivated. China and India are the first countries to seriously grapple with the issue. This report provides an overview of the global situation and it highlights the efforts China and India are making to ensure the long-term health of this resource upon which billions trust their lives.