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close this bookStructures Suitable for Emergency Storage in Tropical Countries (NRI)
close this folderPart II: Users' guide to relief foot! stores
View the documentIntroduction to users' guide
View the documentStorage operations
View the documentStorage costs
View the documentWhat size of structure to order
View the documentChoosing emergency stores
View the documentSuppliers' data
View the documentWooden pallet manufactures
View the documentResponsibilities for purchasers and users of temporary stores

Choosing emergency stores

In Section Storage operations it is shown that temporary stores are preferable where speed is essential, but more permanent stores are easier to manage. From Section Storage costs a guide to 1987 costs is available and in Section What size of structure to order a simple method of calculating store size is suggested. The decision tree (see Figure 1, p. 22) allows all these factors to be taken into account and in addition takes account of the following priorities in order of importance:

A: Is the warning of the emergency early or late?

If the warning is early, use the left-hand branch where more permanent structures, either local or imported, are feasible. If the warning is late, more temporary storage systems must be employed. However, the food store only has a function once a flow of relief food supplies is established, and the assessment of urgency should take into account the time needed to achieve this.

B: Is funding ample or scarce?

Many relief agencies can command appropriate funds but this priority is included to help keep capital costs in mind. For example, plastic-clad stores are about £56 per tonne stored while tarpaulins are £11 and therefore can, in the short term, afford five times as much protection for the same expenditure.

C: Is site management good or poor?

Branches stemming from poor management include the decision that imported supervision will be needed for store erection. Branches stemming from good management embrace difficult-to-manage systems like cover and plinth (CAP) storage and air-supported warehouses.

D: Is site transport and labour availability good or poor?

Branches stemming from poor transport/labour include facilities to speed up the turn-round of lorries. Hence, for example, drive-through stores or stores with canopies are recommended.

In the majority of food-relief emergencies warnings are late but there is ample funding; on-site management is usually good but in our experience transport is often poor. In this case the locally made plastic-covered wooden frame structure is ideal. If such structures are not easily available locally, imported plastic-clad structures should be used. Whatever the type of preferred store, selected by means of Figure 1 or otherwise, it is recommended very strongly that IN EVERY EMERGENCY STORAGE

SITUATION AS AN INSURANCE AGAINST DELAYS AND AS A FIRST-AID MEASURE, TARPAULINS SHOULD BE PURCHASED AND DESPATCHED BY AIR TO COVER THE INITIAL STORAGE REQUIREMENT. THE PROCUREMENT OF OTHER STRUCTURES FOR THE TOTAL REQUIREMENT CAN THEN PROCEED NORMALLY.

In dry weather additional storage can be obtained with temporary bag stacks (covered with tarpaulins). This is particularly useful at intermediate storage centres between port and distribution points (Friendship, 1987).


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