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close this book Boiling Point No. 13 - August 1987
View the document SAFER AND LESS SMOKY STOVES
View the document COOKSTOVE SMOKE AND HEALTH
View the document THE PERFORMANCE OF A MULTI-POT STOVE ; TOXICITY OF FUMES
View the document CARBON MONOXIDE CONTAMINATION IN DWELLINGS IN POOR RURAL AREAS OF GUATEMALA
View the document SARVODAYA GIVE PRIORITY TO HEALTH AND SAFETY IN SRI LANKA KITCHENS
View the document STOVE EFFICIENCIES AND HARMFUL EMISSIONS
View the document IMPROVED STOVES: SAFETY IS IMPORTANT TOO
View the document BURUNDI IMPROVED CHARCOAL STOVES
View the document TRADITIONAL DOMESTIC HEATING IN AFGHANISTAN by Abdul Shakoor Raji
View the document UGANDA CONSIDERS 2.45 MILLION NEW STOVES PLAN
View the document MOROGORO FUELWOOD STOVE PROJECT TANZANIA
View the document SIERRA LEONE WOODSTOVE TRIALS
View the document DOMESTIC ENERGY IN THE SAHEL
View the document FIREWOOD CONSUMPTION BY THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY
View the document BRUNTLAND COMMISSION REPORT
View the document IMPROVED CHULHA
View the document READERS VIEWS AND QUESTIONS
View the document NEWS
View the document PUBLICATION

IMPROVED STOVES: SAFETY IS IMPORTANT TOO

By Anne Sefu, Morogoro Fuelwood Stove Project, Morogoro, Tanzania

The safety aspect of an improved stove seldom seems to be accorded the importance that is given to other aspects of stove design. Hence the comment, without clarification, in a report by a team of overseas stove experts who had visited the Morogoro Fuelwood Stove Project that "only a limited number of pans could be used on the Morogoro Stove". This is due, in fact, to the inbuilt safety feature of the stove whereby the pan is normally partly inserted into the stove (shown in Fig. I ) where it is securely held between the upper parts of the pot-rests. Nevertheless, there is an alternative position (shown in Fig. 2) which allows for larger pans to be placed on top of the stove, although this is the more dangerous way. In fact this is the way that is always used with the traditional metal charcoal stoves.


Figure 1.


Figure 2.

It is common knowledge to Morogoro residents that many accidents occur to children through the use of the traditional stove. This is doubtless true of all East Africa where this type of stove is used almost universally for charcoal. It is all too easy for an energetic child to knock against the pan - the stove is invariably placed on the floor - and send it flying, often resulting in the contents spilling either all over the child or one of his/her playmates.

Zaina Amadi, a domestic worker in Morogoro, tells of such an accident in her own home. While a pan of soup was cooking on the metal stove, she left the kitchen unattended for a few minutes; in her absence, her three year old daughter, Zena, overturned the pan and fell into the pool of boiling hot liquid spilt on the floor. She was severely burnt on her buttocks and thighs, taking many weeks to recover. She was lucky, not all the burn victims recover and there are dozens a year in this small town alone.

Zena's mother, who now has a Morogoro Charcoal Stove (see BP 10), says that if she had had this stove earlier, the accident would probably not have happened because "It's not easy to push the pan off the stove when it's sitting right inside it.. And she adds, "With those metal stoves, if a child just touches the outside she gets burnt, but with the ceramic ones (Morogoro Stove) the outside doesn't get very hot at all..

I hope that the planners of future stove programmes, and those currently implementing existing stove programmes - wherever they may be - will coasider these points when selecting a stove model for mass dissemination.