Cover Image
close this book Animal traction
View the document About this manual
View the document About the author
View the document Acknowledgments
close this folder 1. Introduction
View the document What is animal traction?
View the document History of animal traction
View the document Why use animal traction?
View the document Some considerations
View the document How can animal traction be used?
View the document Before beginning: what do you need to know?
close this folder 2. Draft animal selection
View the document Popular draft animals
View the document Determining power requirements
View the document General rules concerning power requirements
View the document Method for determining size of the hitch
View the document Determining weights of animals
View the document Selection of individual draft animals
View the document Conformation
View the document Temperament
close this folder 3. Animal husbandry
View the document Sheller
View the document Nutrition
View the document Grooming
View the document Minor medical problems and first aid
close this folder 4. Training draft animals
View the document Before training begins
View the document General comments on training procedure
View the document Training cattle
View the document Program for training cattle
View the document Training horses, donkeys and mules
View the document Program for training horses, donkeys and mules
close this folder 5. Yokes and harnesses
View the document Yokes and harnesses for cattle
View the document Yokes and harnesses for horses, donkeys and mules
View the document How to harness a horse, donkey or mule
View the document Steering systems
View the document Breeching harness
close this folder 6. Hitches
View the document Safety rules
View the document Implement hitches
View the document Vehicle hitches
View the document 7. Field operations and implements
close this folder 8. Economic and technical assistance
View the document Farm planning assistance
View the document Equipment options
View the document Credit for equipment
View the document Credit for animals
View the document Procedures and controls
close this folder 9. Animal traction extension
View the document Extension education
View the document Appendix A: Animal power
close this folder Appendix B: Animal nutrition
View the document Energy needs: bovine animals
View the document Energy needs: equine animals
View the document Nutrient needs of draft animals: protein, minerals, vitamins
View the document Feeds and feed composition
View the document Calculating a ration
View the document Recommended rations and feeding practices
close this folder Appendix C: Disease recognition and control
View the document Parasites and parasitic disease
View the document Appendix D: Workshop and spare parts inventory
View the document Appendix E: Animal traction instruction forms
View the document Appendix F: Animal breeds used for power
View the document Bibliography
View the document Resources
View the document GIossary

Determining weights of animals

To determine an animal's weight, first measure the length of the animal from point of shoulder to point of rump (A-B) and the circumference of its torso at point of heart (C) with a tape or rope. (See the drawing on page 20.) When taking the torso or girth measurement, observe these rules:

• Measure in the morning before the animal drinks. Don't give it hay the night before.

• Have the animal stand squarely with its head in a normal position.

• Pull the tape snugly around the torso, at the smallest circumference behind the shoulders.


Table 4-Power of Bulls (in yoke)

Next, follow these formulas:

For bovine animals

Substitute measurements A-B (length) and C (circumference of torso at point of heart, or girth) into this formula:

(girth x girth x length)/300 = weight

For this formula, measurements must be taken in inches. If a metric tape or rope/rule is used to measure the animal, centimeters must be converted to inches before the formula can be used. One inch = 2.54 cm.

Example:

Girth of bull measures 152 cm, length measures 135 cm.

152/2.54 = 60 inches (girth)

135/2.54 = 53 inches (length)

(60 x 60 x 53)/300 = 636 lbs

Since one kg = 2.2 lbs, the weight of the animal in kg is obtained by dividing 2.2 into the answer above (636 lbs).

636/2.2 = 289 kg

The bull weighs 636 lbs or 289 kg.

An alternate method for estimating the weight of a steer (castrated bull):

Live weight • 1.04 [27.5758 x heart girth) -1.04967]


For equine animals

Substitute measurements A-B (length) and C (girth) into this formula:

(girth x girth x length)/300 + 50 lbs = weight

Measurements must be taken in inches, or converted into inches, before the formula is used.

Example:

Donkey's girth measures 37 inches, donkey's length measures 35 inches.

(37 x 37 x 35)/300 + 50 = weight of donkey

160 + 50 = 210 lbs

If the animal's weight is to be expressed in kg,

210/2.2 = 95 kg

The donkey weighs 210 lbs or 95 kg.